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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Denver in Denver County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Warehouses

Lower Downtown Historic District

 

—Established 1988 —

 
Warehouses Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 27, 2018
1. Warehouses Marker
Inscription.
Denver grew from its humble beginnings along the banks of Cherry Creek in the 1860’s, to a well-organized and prosperous city by the turn of the century. The “rail-age” of Denver’s history brought tremendous growth and turned thought form mining to merchandising.

Originally built to house the goods and supplies coming into and going out of Denver by rail, the warehouses along Wynkoop and Wazee Streets were busy distribution centers. Well-known architects, such as Frank Edbrooke, designer of the Brown Palace and the Oxford Hotel, were commissioned to build large, prestigious buildings that served not only as warehouse space, but also as corporate offices.

Characterized by elaborate brickwork, and Romanesque arches, sandstone trim and many times, granite foundations, the buildings of the warehouse area were built to create an image as well as provide large functional work and storage space. Even specialized warehousing such as the Littleton Creamery – Beatrice Warehouse of 1801 Wynkoop, employed decorative brick banding to enliven the windowless walls required for Denver’s largest cold storage plant.

Now, although restored for modern day uses, many vestiges of the past can still be seen. Evidence of the covered loading docks and rail spurs along the front of each block can still be
Warehouses Marker (<i>wide view; marker visible left of door</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 27, 2018
2. Warehouses Marker (wide view; marker visible left of door)
found by careful observers. Interior treatments of Oregon pine and oak trim, pressed metal ceilings and maple floors are architectural reminders of Denver’s grand past; standing evidence of the small mining town that grew into a great industrial and supply city.
 
Erected by Denver Landmark Commission & Lower Downtown Historic District.
 
Location. 39° 45.211′ N, 104° 59.918′ W. Marker is in Denver, Colorado, in Denver County. Marker is on Wynkoop Street south of 18th Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is a large metal plaque, mounted at eye-level, just left of the Wynkoop Street doorway, on the former J.S. Brown Mercantile Building - one of the former warehouse buildings described by the marker. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1634 18th Street, Denver CO 80202, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 18th St. Atrium / Littleton Creamery Beatrice Cold Storage Warehouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Edward W. Wynkoop (within shouting distance of this marker); Union Station (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Denver City Railway Building (about 400 feet away); The People of the Station
J.S. Brown Mercantile (<i>former warehouse with elaborate brickwork & romanesque arches</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 27, 2018
3. J.S. Brown Mercantile (former warehouse with elaborate brickwork & romanesque arches)
(about 400 feet away); Welcome to Union Station (about 400 feet away); Union Station Timeline (about 400 feet away); When the Depot Became a Station (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Denver.
 
Regarding Warehouses. National Register of Historic Places (1988). The J.S. Brown Mercantile Building has housed the Wynkoop Brewing Company since 1988, began by Denver's former Mayor and Colorado Governor, John Hickenlooper.
 
Also see . . .
1. J.S. Brown Mercantile Building.
Though the J.S. Brown Mercantile Building was not built until 1899, the area it is built on and the owner, John Sidney Brown, had been doing business with miners, brewers and grocers since 1861. In 1868, J.S. Brown was among the men who broke ground for the railroad in Denver. A strong advocate and key player in bringing the railroad to Denver, Brown lobbied and raised money until the completion of Union Station, 13 years later. In 1902, the Mercantile building was named “a magnificent structure, fitted up in a perfectly modern style, having railroad switches in its front and rear, and every convenience necessary for the prompt transacting of business” by the Denver Times (Denver Post). (Submitted on June 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Littleton Creamery/Beatrice Cold Storage (<i>former warehouse with decorative brick banding</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 27, 2018
4. Littleton Creamery/Beatrice Cold Storage (former warehouse with decorative brick banding)
 

2. J. S. Brown Mercantile.
By 1899, Denver's pioneer grocer, J.S. Brown, ran the largest such business in the West from this building. J.S. Brown died in 1913, but his sons ran the business until the Great Depression of the 1930s. The building continued as a warehouse until very recent times. Now the building houses the Wynkoop Brewery and Restaurant. (Submitted on June 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Littleton Creamery / Beatrice Warehouse / Ice House Building.
The Littleton Creamery building, built in 1903, had five stories and a basement. Most of this building was used for cold storage of dairy products; hence no windows on the third and fourth stories. The owners added a second attached building in 1912, and four years later a third. The buildings now house restaurants and up-scale loft/residences. (Submitted on June 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ArchitectureIndustry & Commerce
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 14, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 10, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 47 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on June 10, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4. submitted on June 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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