Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Santa Monica in Los Angeles County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Douglas DC-3

“Spirit of Santa Monica”

 
 
Douglas DC-3 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, May 27, 2018
1. Douglas DC-3 Marker
Inscription. The first flight of a DC-3 took place on December 17, 1935, at the Santa Monica Airport. These aircraft were so successful and reliable that many DC-3 aircraft remain in service throughout the world today.
The aircraft on display was built here at Santa Monica Airport and delivered to the U.S. Army Air Corps as a C-53-DO on February 17, 1942. Its initial role was as a 28-seat paratrooper and glider tug.

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Powerplant: Two Pratt & Whitney R-1830-92 Twin Wasp 14-cylinder radials with a takeoff rating of 1,050 hp and a maximum rating of 1,200 hp at 7,500 feet
Wingspan: 95 feet
Wing Area: 987 square feet
Length: 63 feet, 9 inches
Empty Weight: 18,000 lbs
Loaded Weight: 26,000 lbs
Maximum Weight: 31,000 lbs
Maximum Speed: 230 mph @8,800 feet
Cruising Speed: 160 mph
Stall Speed: 67 mph

HISTORY OF THIS AIRCRAFT
February 17, 1942: Delivered to the USAAC as 41_20107
February 21, 1942: Transferred to the US Navy as a R4D-3 as BuAer No. 05075
August 31, 1946: Retired from military service, purchased by Nationwide Airlines as DC-3 tail # NC1075M
December 1, 1953: Purchased by Richfield Oil Company
April 4, 1956: Reregistered as N60R
Fall of 1957: Reregistered as N596AR to Atlantic Refining Company
May
Douglas DC-3 and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, May 27, 2018
2. Douglas DC-3 and Marker
1970: Reregistered to Atlantic Richfield Company of Philadelphia
By 1985: Stored at Sonoma County Airport
Spring of 1989: Displayed at the Museum of Flying, Santa Monica, on loan from the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
May 1, 1997: Purchased by David G. Price from the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
October 6, 2004: Donated to the City of Santa Monica by David G. Price
June, 2005: Restoration team begins work on the "Spirit of Santa Monica"
December 17, 2005: Ceremony for the completed restoration and groundbreaking for the monument
March 21, 2009: DC-3 "Spirit of Santa Monica” monument dedication
 
Erected 2009.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West marker series.
 
Location. 34° 0.904′ N, 118° 26.859′ W. Marker is in Santa Monica, California, in Los Angeles County. Marker is at the intersection of Airport Avenue and Donald Douglas Loop, on the left when traveling west on Airport Avenue. Touch for map. At the Museum of Flying. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3100 Airport Ave, Santa Monica CA 90405, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Tongva Springs (approx. 2.2 miles away);
Douglas DC-3 image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, May 27, 2018
3. Douglas DC-3
In front of the Museum of Flying, on the south side of Santa Monica Airport.
La Ballona School (approx. 2.2 miles away); Shotgun House (approx. 2.2 miles away); Ocean Park Branch Library (approx. 2.2 miles away); Roy Jones House (approx. 2.3 miles away); Veterans Memorial Building (VMB) (approx. 2.6 miles away); “The Ink Well” (approx. 2.6 miles away); The Helmsman (approx. 2.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Santa Monica.
 
Also see . . .  Douglas DC-3 Monument. Museum of Flying website has information on this and other aircraft on display. (Submitted on June 22, 2018.) 
 
Categories. Air & SpaceIndustry & Commerce
 
Boeing 737 image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, May 27, 2018
4. Boeing 737
Marker Inside Museum image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, May 27, 2018
5. Marker Inside Museum
Santa Monica Airport “Clover Field”, opened in 1919, is recognized nationally for its role in shaping the future of aviation.
Marker Inside Museum image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, May 27, 2018
6. Marker Inside Museum
First Aircraft to fly around the world, 1924.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 28, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 22, 2018, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. This page has been viewed 37 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 22, 2018, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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