Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Markham in Matagorda County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

J.S. Abercrombie Mineral Company

Oil Well Pumping Rig

 
 
J.S. Abercrombie Mineral Company Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 15, 2018
1. J.S. Abercrombie Mineral Company Marker
Inscription. Click to hear the inscription.  
In 1920, near Clemville, Texas, J.S. Abercrombie Mineral Company put this pumping rig into operation on a new oil well at a location west of present El Dorado Road. In 1927 the well went dry, and the pumping rig was not used again.

In 1980 J.G. “Pappy” Stone donated this example of an early oil well pumping rig to A.W. “Al” Hurta, Matagorda County Commissioner, Precinct No. 4. The same year it was moved to this location and restored as a reminder of the county’s oil production in the early years of this century.
 
Erected 1980 by Matagorda County & J.G. “Pappy” Stone.
 
Location. 28° 57.646′ N, 96° 3.931′ W. Marker is in Markham, Texas, in Matagorda County. Marker is on Broadway (Farm to Market Road 1468) south of 4th Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is a metal plaque, mounted at eye-level, directly on the subject oil rig, and located in the Markham Community Center Park between 3rd and 4th streets on Broadway. Marker is in this post office area: Markham TX 77456, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
J.S. Abercrombie Mineral Company Marker (<i>tall view; marker is mounted on bandwheel support</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 15, 2018
2. J.S. Abercrombie Mineral Company Marker (tall view; marker is mounted on bandwheel support)
At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Elliott's Ferry (approx. 4˝ miles away); Clemville (approx. 5.1 miles away); Sugar Cane Mill (approx. 6 miles away); Bay City Post Office (approx. 6 miles away); Old Bay City Bank (approx. 6 miles away); Matagorda, C.S.A. (approx. 6 miles away); Ira Ingram (approx. 6 miles away); Matagorda County Confederate Memorial (approx. 6 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. James Smither Abercrombie. James Smither Abercrombie, oilman, Houston civic leader, and philanthropist, was born in Huntsville, Texas, on July 7, 1891. In 1918 he used his savings and a loan to buy a used drilling rig to drill on his own in the Burkburnett oilfield, north of Wichita Falls. In 1920, he bought, with Harry Cameron, the Cameron-Davant Company, a business that sold oil-drilling supplies and parts for rigs and wells. Jim Abercrombie became the unsalaried president of Cameron Iron Works, and before his thirtieth birthday he was the president of the expanding James S. Abercrombie Company, an independent drilling operation with five rigs. (Submitted on June 29, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Old Stuff from the Oil Fields. The big wheels on those old pump jacks are "band wheels", which connect the pumpjack to an engine of one sort or another
1920 Abercrombie Mineral Company Oil Pumping Rig image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 15, 2018
3. 1920 Abercrombie Mineral Company Oil Pumping Rig
- steam in the old days, and oil or electric these days. A giant belt, in other words the "band", enables the engine to rotate the axis of the band wheel. A pivot arm called a "pitman" runs from the outer edge of the band wheel to the back end of the walking beam, and as the wheel rotates this pivot arm causes the beam to rock back and forth, thus moving the sucker rods up and down. (Submitted on June 29, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 4, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 29, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 42 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 29, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement