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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hawesville in Hancock County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Hawesville Railroad Station

 
 
Hawesville Railroad Station Marker (<i>side 1</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 17, 2017
1. Hawesville Railroad Station Marker (side 1)
Inscription. Click to hear the inscription.  
(side 1)
Rails of Louisville, St. Louis, and Texas Railroad laid here June 9, 1888. First passenger train ran between Owensboro and Stephensport Oct. 7, 1888. Service between Evansville and Louisville began in April 1889. Rail line later became Louisville, Henderson, St. Louis R.R. and then part of L&N system in 1929. See over

(side 2)
Present station constructed 1902; additions made ca. 1919. During heyday, six L&N trains stopped here daily. Embarkation point for Army troops during World War I. Pres. Harry S. Truman spoke here during an election campaign whistlestop, Sept. 30, 1948. Local passenger service ended in the late 1950s. See over.
 
Erected 1989 by National-Southwire Aluminum Co., Kentucky Historical Society & Kentucky Department of Highways. (Marker Number 1856.)
 
Location. 37° 54.105′ N, 86° 44.828′ W. Marker is in Hawesville, Kentucky, in Hancock County. Marker is on River Street north of Bridge Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map.
Hawesville Railroad Station Marker (<i>side 2</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 17, 2017
2. Hawesville Railroad Station Marker (side 2)
Marker is located near the entrance to the former Hawesville Railroad Depot which now houses the Hancock County Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 110 River Street, Hawesville KY 42348, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. County Named - 1829 (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Veterans Memorial (approx. 3.6 miles away in Indiana); Tell City Hall (approx. 3.6 miles away in Indiana); A Bit of Swiss (approx. 3.7 miles away in Indiana); Perry County Indiana Honor Roll Memorial (approx. 3.7 miles away in Indiana); Army and Air National Guard Veterans Memorial (approx. 3.7 miles away in Indiana); Abraham S. Fulton (approx. 7.2 miles away in Indiana); Lincoln Family Trail (approx. 7.6 miles away).
 
Regarding Hawesville Railroad Station. Former Hawesville Railroad Depot now houses the Hancock County Museum.
 
Also see . . .
1. Hawesville Railroad Station. The Hawesville railroad station was built in 1902 out of Southern pine, and stood 18 feet wide by 81.5 feet long. It is next to the railroad tracks on River Street along the Ohio River bank. The Hawesville railroad station served as the chief transportation center for Hancock County for many years. The last passenger train passed
Hawesville Railroad Station Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 17, 2017
3. Hawesville Railroad Station Marker (tall view)
through the old station in 1959. The station later served as Hawesville's City Hall for 16 years. In 1981 the town constructed its present city hall building, leaving the depot to fall into disrepair. It was sold to the Hancock County Historical Society for $1 and a lease was signed with CSX Railroad to leave it in intact. The historical society raised funds and used volunteers to restore the building and convert it into the present Hancock County Museum. (Submitted on July 6, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The Louisville and Nashville Railroad. According to the Louisville & Nashville Railroad Historical Society the Louisville & Nashville Railroad was created on March 5, 1850 when the state of Kentucky issued a charter for the company "...to build a railroad between Louisville, Kentucky, and the Tennessee state line in the direction of Nashville." A little more than a year later a similar proclamation was granted through Tennessee on December 4, 1851 which gave the L&N legal authority to construct a line from Louisville to Nashville. (Submitted on July 6, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Louisville and Nashville Railroad. The Louisville and Nashville Railroad grew into one of the great success stories of American business. Operating under one name continuously for
Hawesville Railroad Station Marker (<i>wide view; Hawesville Railroad Station in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 17, 2017
4. Hawesville Railroad Station Marker (wide view; Hawesville Railroad Station in background)
132 years, it survived civil war and economic depression and several waves of social and technological change. Growth of the railroad continued until its purchase and the tumultuous rail consolidations of the 1980s which led to continual successors. The combined company became CSX Transportation (CSX), which now owns and operates all of the former Louisville and Nashville lines. (Submitted on July 6, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Railroads & Streetcars
 
Hawesville Railroad Station image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 17, 2017
5. Hawesville Railroad Station
Hawesville Railroad Station and L&N Caboose image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 17, 2017
6. Hawesville Railroad Station and L&N Caboose
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 10, 2018. This page originally submitted on July 6, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 36 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 6, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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