Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Glenwood Springs in Garfield County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Hughes-Anderson Building

 
 
Hughes-Anderson Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 7, 2018
1. Hughes-Anderson Building Marker
Inscription. The commercial building at 824-826 Grand Avenue was constructed in 1888. The brick building was initially occupied by a hardware store and an agricultural implement shop on the first floor, furnished rooms on the second floor, and a tin shop in the basement.

During the 1890's, Edwin S. Hughes moved into the building with his Glenwood Bottling Works. He bottled aerated drinks such as ginger ale, sarsaparilla, and beer. He also had a small plant adjacent to the Yampa Spring to bottle and ship mineral water world wide as a health tonic.

In 1894, Hughes expanded into the liquor business. The address of 824-826 was now Hughes Wholesale Liquors. In addition to the Hughes liquor outlet, the south half of the main floor was occupied between 1898 and 1904 by the city fire department. After the death of Edwin Hughes in 1915, the Hughes Wholesale Liquor was managed and later owned by brother-in-law Joe F. Benedeck. Beginning in the 1930's, it became Benedeck's, a wholesale merchandise store that remained through the early 1970's.

At this same time, Iola Rooms occupied the upper floor of the building. There were twenty-eight furnished rooms to rent from the 1880's through the 1950's. In 1917 (during the Spanish Flu Pandemic), these rooms served as an emergency hospital for the county.

The long family
Hughes-Anderson Building Marker can be seen just past the door entrance on right. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 7, 2018
2. Hughes-Anderson Building Marker can be seen just past the door entrance on right.
ownership of the building finally changed hands in 1972 when Myron Brockway purchased the building. His ownership was not for long. He sold the business to Phil & Joan Anderson in 1980. Their business, Anderson's Pants Pocket, was already located in the south lower corner. The Andersons did some needed repairs and updates to the building. A new roof, the second floor was completely refurbished for offices. In 1989 and 1992, the exterior stucco was added to the side and front of the building. Although many updates have been made to the building over its 100 plus years, the original cast iron storefront can still be seen through the windows.
 
Erected by the Frontier Historical Society and the City of Glenwood Springs.
 
Location. 39° 32.746′ N, 107° 19.477′ W. Marker is in Glenwood Springs, Colorado, in Garfield County. Marker is on Grand Avenue (Colorado Route 82) north of 9th Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 824 Grand Avenue, Glenwood Springs CO 81601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. I.O.O.F. Building (within shouting distance of this marker); McCoy-Armory Building (within shouting distance of this marker); David Delaplane, Father of Colorado Mountain College
Hughes-Anderson Building image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 7, 2018
3. Hughes-Anderson Building
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Healthy Atmosphere Rehabilitated Soldiers (about 300 feet away); CCC Men Built Improvements for Glenwood (about 300 feet away); Immigrants Found Future in Colorado (about 300 feet away); When Snow Slides Closed the Canyon (about 300 feet away); And Devereux Said Unto Glenwood, "Let There Be Light" (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Glenwood Springs.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNotable Buildings
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 14, 2018. This page originally submitted on July 13, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 47 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 13, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.