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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Toledo in Lucas County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Blade

 
 
The Blade Marker (<i>side 1</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 28, 2018
1. The Blade Marker (side 1)
Inscription.
(marker side 1)
The Toledo Blade is the city's oldest continuing business. The newspaper was first published on December 19, 1835, during the Ohio-Michigan boundary dispute known as the "Toledo War." The name is derived from that conflict and the famous swords of Toledo, Spain. A copy of the first edition and two gift swords from that Spanish city are displayed inside the Blade Building.

(marker side 2)
David Ross Locke, editor (1865-1888), made The Blade nationally known. Using the pseudonym, Petroleum V. Nasby, Locke gained fame for his satirical Nasby Letters and advocacy of social reforms.

On May 1, 1927, President Coolidge assisted Paul Block, Blade publisher (1926-1941), by touching a gold key at the White House to officially start the presses at this location.

Toledo Sesquicentennial Commission
and
The Ohio Historical Society.

 
Erected 1987 by Toledo Sesquicentennial Commission and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 19-48.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 41° 39.299′ N, 83° 32′ 
The Blade Marker (<i>side 2</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 28, 2018
2. The Blade Marker (side 2)
W. Marker is in Toledo, Ohio, in Lucas County. Marker is on North Superior Street 0.1 miles north of Jackson Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located beside the sidewalk, near the southeast corner of the Toledo Blade building, between the building and the associated parking lot. Marker is at or near this postal address: 541 North Superior Street, Toledo OH 43660, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Engine House Number One / Neptune Engine No. 1 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Toledo (about 400 feet away); Spanish American War Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Lucas County (approx. 0.2 miles away); War Savings Stamps (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Lucas County (approx. 0.2 miles away); William McKinley Monument (approx. 0.2 miles away); Toledo’s Canals (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Toledo.
 
Also see . . .
1. David Ross Locke. David Ross Locke was an American journalist and early political commentator during and after the American Civil War. During the war, he edited and wrote for the Toledo Blade in Toledo, Ohio, which he purchased in 1867. Locke's fictional alter ego, Nasby, loudly championed the cause of the Confederate States of America from Secession onward, but did little to actively help it. They were consciously intended to rally support
The Blade Marker (<i>wide view; looking north on Superior Street; Blade building in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 28, 2018
3. The Blade Marker (wide view; looking north on Superior Street; Blade building in background)
for the Union cause; "Nasby" himself was portrayed as a thoroughly detestable character. Abraham Lincoln loved the Nasby Letters, and quoted them frequently. He is quoted as saying, "I intend to tell him if he will communicate his talent to me, I will swap places with him!" (Submitted on August 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The Toledo War: When Michigan and Ohio Nearly Came to Blows. The so-called “Toledo War” had its roots in the shortcomings of 18th century geography. In 1787, Congress drafted the Northwest Ordinance, which stipulated that 260,000 square miles of territory surrounding the Great Lakes would eventually be carved into a handful of new states. Specifically, the law decreed that the border between Ohio and Michigan was to run on “an east and west line drawn through the southerly bend or extreme of Lake Michigan” until it intersected with Lake Erie. There was just one problem: the best available maps depicted Lake Michigan’s southern tip as being several miles north of its true location. As a result, the original border placed the mouth of the Maumee River and the future city of Toledo in northern Ohio rather than in southern Michigan. Ohio and Michigan both had good reason for wanting control of Toledo and the Maumee River. By 1825, the completion of the Erie Canal had linked the Great Lakes to the east coast, presenting valuable opportunities
Toledo Blade Building (<i>north side</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 28, 2018
4. Toledo Blade Building (north side)
for trade. (Submitted on August 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. CommunicationsIndustry & Commerce
 
Toledo Blade Building image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 28, 2018
5. Toledo Blade Building
Toledo Blade building image. Click for full size.
Hauger, Dressel & Hunt (photo courtesy of the Indiana University Libraries), circa 1930
6. Toledo Blade building
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 13, 2018. This page originally submitted on August 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 33 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   6. submitted on August 13, 2018. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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