Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Carlisle in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Improvised Explosive Devices (IED)

 
 
Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, September 5, 2018
1. Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Marker
Inscription.
Improvised Explosive Devices (IED)

IEDs are low-technology explosive devices, which are usually homemade. Materials used to make these devices vary widely and include locally sourced switches, power supplies, initiators, explosive devices, and charge containers. IEDs are commonly hidden beside and underneath sections of roadway or under roadside debris. They can be set off using a variety of remote trigger mechanisms, such as a cell phone, pager, hand-held radio, garage door opener, or even simply by pressure.

In order to increase the effectiveness of IEDs, they can be stacked on top of one another or linked together through methods known as coupling and daisy-chaining (shown in this exhibit). When a vehicle passes into the blast zone, the linked devices are then detonated underneath or around it. Insurgents use IEDs to disrupt or distract coalition patrols and convoys, and thereby cause confusion in order to gain some superiority in a potential…
 
Erected by U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center.
 
Location. 40° 12.456′ N, 77° 9.525′ W. Marker is in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in Cumberland County. Marker can be reached from Army Heritage Drive. Touch for map. The marker is on
Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, September 5, 2018
2. Improvised Explosive Device (IED) Marker
The marker is behind the guardrail. A dummy IED is displayed next to it.
the U.S. Army Heritage Trail in the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center. Marker is in this post office area: Carlisle PA 17013, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sergeant (SGT) Robert Easley, Jr. (here, next to this marker); HESCO in Iraq (within shouting distance of this marker); HESCO at Home (within shouting distance of this marker); HESCO in Afghanistan (within shouting distance of this marker); Hesco Barriers (within shouting distance of this marker); Specialist (SPC) Charles Posey III (within shouting distance of this marker); Machine Gun Post (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Welcome to the World War I Trench System Exhibit (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Carlisle.
 
Categories. War, Afghanistan
 
Insert image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, September 5, 2018
3. Insert
Caption: This roadside IED was created from an Anti-Tank mine and three 105mm projectiles that were wired to be remotely detonated. This IED would be hidden and detonated as vehicles passed.
Insert image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, September 5, 2018
4. Insert
Vehicle borne IEDs (VBIED) or “car bombs” create large-scale damage, especially in an Urban area. Vehicles can transport and hold large quantities of explosives. The two gas cans in this van were filled with fertilizers…
Insert image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, September 5, 2018
5. Insert
Caption: Artillery and mortar shells are a common IED threat. The shells are filled with explosives, wired to a battery, and then triggered by a pressure plate or remote detonation.
Insert image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, September 5, 2018
6. Insert
Caption: In Afghanistan, the explosives of choice are common fertilizers mixed in a storage container. The container is often filled with bullets or nails, and then wired to receive a charge of electricity remotely or manually. These IEDs are placed in small, public places.
An IED display hidden behind the guardrail image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, September 5, 2018
7. An IED display hidden behind the guardrail
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 17, 2018. This page originally submitted on September 11, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 53 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 11, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   7. submitted on September 16, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement We are suspending Amazon.com advertising until they remove an ad for a certain book from circulation. A word in the book’s title has given rise to number of complaints. The word is inappropriate in school classroom settings.