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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Balsam Grove in Transylvania County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Restoring A Forest

 
 
Restoring A Forest Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 11, 2018
1. Restoring A Forest Marker
Inscription. Commercial logging and devastating wildfires scarred the forests of America in the early decades of the 1900s. To repair the damage, the United States Forest Service began the "Penny Pine" program in the 1930s, encouraging people to donate a penny to grow and plant a tree seedling. Forests throughout the country were replanted through these donations.

The North Carolina Daughters of the American Revolution donated money to plant 50,000 red spruce trees on the mountainside across the road from Devils Courthouse. The DAR Jubilee Memorial Forest was planted over a three-year period from 1941-1943 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 35° 18.312′ N, 82° 53.958′ W. Marker is near Balsam Grove, North Carolina, in Transylvania County. Marker is on Blue Ridge Parkway (at milepost 422.4), 0.9 miles north of Lake Logan Road (State Highway 215), on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located at the Devil's Courthouse overlook, on a platform beside the sidewalk, near the northeast corner of the parking lot. Marker is in this post office area: Balsam Grove NC 28708, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Marker detail: North Carolina Confederate Veterans Memorial Forest dedication ceremony image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: North Carolina Confederate Veterans Memorial Forest dedication ceremony
The dedication ceremony for the Daughters of the American Revolution Jubilee Memorial Forest in 1940. DAR chapters across the country paid for five million trees to he planted in forests in 36 states and the District of Columbia.
At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Devil's Courthouse (a few steps from this marker); North Carolina Confederate Veterans Memorial Forest (approx. 0.4 miles away); Forest Decline (approx. 4 miles away); Highest Elevation on Blue Ridge Parkway (approx. 4 miles away); Looking Glass Rock (approx. 4.2 miles away); a different marker also named Looking Glass Rock (approx. 6.9 miles away); Civilian Conservation Corps (approx. 7.3 miles away); Forestry School (approx. 7.4 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large composite plaque, mounted horizontally on waist-high posts.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. North Carolina Confederate Veterans Memorial Forest
 
Also see . . .
1. North Carolina Confederate Veterans Memorial Forest. For the Confederate forest one acre of trees was to be planted by the Forest Service for each five dollar donation raised by the U.D.C. which was given a choice of locations. The site finally chosen had been logged in the early 1900ís leaving a barren, flood-prone mountainside. This location was picked because it was on the route of the Blue Ridge Parkway then under construction. By the summer of 1942 enough funds had been
Marker detail: Logging company "slash" image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Logging company "slash"
Logging companies built railroads into the forests of Appalachia to remove valuable timber. Mountainsides were stripped of trees, and tangles of branches and woody debris—known as slash—were left on the ground. Sparks from trains and logging machinery could ignite the slash, resulting in destructive wildfires.
raised to plant a tree for each of the 125,000 men who had fought for the Confederacy. (Submitted on September 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The "Penny Pine" program. In 1939, the President General, Mrs. Henry M. Robert, chose the Penny Pine program as one of her Golden Jubilee National Projects. Each state was to have a memorial forest, beginning in 1939 and culminating in 1941 on the NSDAR 50th Anniversary. Each chapter across the country was to pledge, at the very least, one acre of pine seedlings. Five dollars an acre at a penny each equals 500 trees. The Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC), under the supervision of the U.S. Forestry Service, would do the actual work of planting and care. (Submitted on September 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Fraternal or Sororal OrganizationsHorticulture & ForestryIndustry & Commerce
 
Restoring A Forest Marker (<i>tall view; Devil's Courthouse trail through trees in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 11, 2018
4. Restoring A Forest Marker (tall view; Devil's Courthouse trail through trees in background)
Restoring A Forest Marker (<i>wide view; Devil's Courthouse formation in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 11, 2018
5. Restoring A Forest Marker (wide view; Devil's Courthouse formation in background)
Devil's Courthouse Overlook Sign (<i>located near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 11, 2018
6. Devil's Courthouse Overlook Sign (located near marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 18, 2018. This page originally submitted on September 15, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 35 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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