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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Staunton, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson

U.S. President 1913–21

 
 
Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
1. Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson Marker
Inscription. Three and one half miles south, on Coalter Street in Staunton, is the birthplace of Thomas Woodrow Wilson, 8th Virginia-born President. New Jersey Governor, 28th President (World War I). He was chief author and sponsor of the League of Nations. Born Dec 28, 1856, died in Washington, Feb 3, 1924. The birthplace is maintained as an historic shrine.
 
Erected 1950 by Virginia Conservation Commission. (Marker Number A-61.)
 
Location. 38° 10.6′ N, 79° 2.124′ W. Marker is near Staunton, Virginia. Marker is on Lee Highway (U.S. 11) south of Woodrow Wilson Parkway (Virginia Route 275), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. It is at the city northern city line. Marker is in this post office area: Staunton VA 24401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Grandma Moses in Augusta County (approx. 1.4 miles away); The Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind (approx. 2.4 miles away); Woodrow Wilson Birthplace (approx. 2.6 miles away); a different marker also named Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson (approx. 2.6 miles away); United States National Military Cemetery - Staunton
Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
2. Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson Marker
(approx. 2.6 miles away); Mary Baldwin College (approx. 2.7 miles away); Dr. William Fleming (approx. 2.8 miles away); T. J. Collins & Son (approx. 2.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Staunton.
 
More about this marker. A similar marker is on U.S. 11 at the southern city line.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. The similar marker on U.S. 11 at the southern city line.
 
Also see . . .
1. History of the Woodrow Wilson Birthplace Foundation. “The drive to purchase the Manse and restore the historic house was led by a group of distinguished Virginia and national leaders, guided by Edith Bolling Galt Wilson, the former President's widow. The other leaders included Admiral Cary Grayson, Wilson's physician and close friend, leading Democratic Party figures Mrs. Cordell Hull, a Staunton native and wife of the Secretary of State, Mr. Jesse Jones, a Texas financier and Secretary of Commerce and Virginia Senators Harry F. Byrd and Carter Glass. In the 1940s the Foundation established an endowment for operations and President Franklin D. Roosevelt
Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
3. Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson
The house, now the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library and Museum, is in on North Coulter Street, at the corner with East Frederick Street in Staunton. Tours are available daily. The white building on the right between the house and the tree is one of buildings on the Mary Baldwin College campus, which is across Frederick Street from the Library.
dedicated the Woodrow Wilson Birthplace as a ‘new shrine of freedom’.” (Submitted on October 11, 2008.) 

2. Brief Biographical Sketch of Wooodrow Wilson. This page is published by The White House in Washington, D.C. “Like Roosevelt before him, Woodrow Wilson regarded himself as the personal representative of the people. ‘No one but the President,’ he said, ‘seems to be expected ... to look out for the general interests of the country.’ He developed a program of progressive reform and asserted international leadership in building a new world order. In 1917 he proclaimed American entrance into World War I a crusade to make the world ‘safe for democracy’.” (Submitted on October 11, 2008.) 

3. Mutual Relation of Masters and Slaves as Taught in the Bible (Joseph Wilson's sermon of 1/6/1861). Available at UNC's Documenting the American South (Submitted on March 17, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Joseph Ruggles Wilson and the Civil War
Woodrow Wilson's father, Joseph Ruggles Wilson, was originally from Steubenville, Ohio. However, after moving to Virginia and becoming the pastor of Staunton's Presbyterian Church, he became "unreconstructedly Southern" in values and politics.

The
Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library Foundation image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
4. Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library Foundation
The offices of the Woodrow Wilson Presidential Library Foundation are housed here, the next house on Coulter Street to the left of the Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson.
family left this residence before the Civil War, and moved to Augusta, Georgia where Joseph Wilson continued in his role as a Presbyterian minister. There, his "Mutual Relation of Masters and Slaves as Taught in the Bible" sermon of January 6, 1861, at the First Presbyterian Church in Augusta, displayed his attitude and drew a great deal of interest. When asked to submit his sermon for publication two days later, Wilson responded, "It is surely high time that the Bible view of slavery should be examined, and that we should begin to meet the infidel fanatacism of our infatuated enemies upon the elevated ground of a divine warrant for the institution we are resolved to cherish." By December, Wilson was directly involved in establishing the Confederate or Southern Presbyterian Church.
    — Submitted March 17, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.

 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson Terrace image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
5. Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson Terrace
This terrace, the gift of the Garden Club of Virginia in 1968, is between the small parking lot on Berkley Place and the gift shop, which is housed in a house that fronts East Frederick Street behind the Woodrow Wilson house. The gift shop is behind the photographer and the parking lot is behind the trees on the distant right.
Entrance to the Garden Behind the Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
6. Entrance to the Garden Behind the Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson
The garden is between the gift shop house and terrace and the birthplace. Tablet on the wall reads “Commemorating the birthplace of Woodrow Wilson. This enclosing wall and garden laid out as of the period of 1846–1857, is dedicated by the Garden Club of Virginia.”
Rear of the Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
7. Rear of the Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson Marker
This view is from the garden behind the house. Gift shop is behind the photographer. The some of the garden paths and stairs were being reconstructed when these photographs were taken.
White Flowering Redbud in Woodrow Wilson Birthplace Garden image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
8. White Flowering Redbud in Woodrow Wilson Birthplace Garden
The gift shop is housed in the building behind this tree. This Cercis canadensis ‘Alba’ was planted on March 22, 2000 in honor of Malcom R. Murlless, Honorary Trustee of the Woodrow Wilson Birthplace.
President Woodrow Wilson image. Click for full size.
By Pach Brothers, New York, December 2, 1912
9. President Woodrow Wilson
This photograph is courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 11, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,072 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on October 11, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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