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Edgefield in Edgefield County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Governors and Lieutenant Governors from Edgefield

 
 
Governors and Lieutenant Governors from Edgefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
1. Governors and Lieutenant Governors from Edgefield Marker
Inscription.
A tribute to the Governers
and Lieutenant Governors of South
Carolina who were
natives of or at one time
residents of Edgefield
District or County.

Governors
Andrew Pickens II (1816-18)
George McDuffie (1834-36)
Pierce Mason Butler (1836-38)
James H. Hammond (1842-44)
Francis W. Pickens (1860-62)
Milledge L. Bonham (1862-64)
John C. Sheppard (July-Dec. 1886)
Benjamin R. Tillman (1890-94)
John Gary Evans (1894-96)
James Strom Thurmond (1947-51)

Lieutenant Governors
Eldred Simkins (1812-14)
W.H. Timmerman (1893-96)
James Hammond Tillman (1901-03)
James O. Sheppard (1932-34)
John C. Sheppard (1884-86)
 
Erected 1933 by D.A.R. Chapters of Edgefield County 1933.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 33° 47.367′ N, 81° 55.767′ W. Marker is in Edgefield, South Carolina, in Edgefield County. Marker is on Main Street (U.S. 25) near Penn Street (South Carolina Highway 23), on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in the northeast section of
Governors and Lieutenant Governors from Edgefield Marker - Reverse image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 10, 2008
2. Governors and Lieutenant Governors from Edgefield Marker - Reverse
Court House Square. Marker is in this post office area: Edgefield SC 29824, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Welcome to Historic Edgefield (here, next to this marker); Lynch Building (within shouting distance of this marker); First Term of Court (within shouting distance of this marker); Edgefield County World War I Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Edgefield County Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Edgefield County Confederate Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Welcome to Historic Edgefield (within shouting distance of this marker); J. Strom Thurmond (within shouting distance of this marker); The Booth-Toney Shootout of 1878 (within shouting distance of this marker); Israel Mukashy Building (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Edgefield.
 
Also see . . .
1. Andrew Pickens (governor). Andrew Pickens, Jr. (December 13, 1779 – July 1, 1838) was an American military and political leader who served as the Democratic-Republican Governor of South Carolina from 1816 until 1818. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. South Carolina Governor Andrew Pickens
Governor George McDuffie<br>(1790-1851) image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
3. Governor George McDuffie
(1790-1851)
S.C. General Assembly 1818-1821
U.S. House of Representatives from S.C. 1821-1834
Governor of S.C. 1834–1836
U.S. Senator from S.C. 1842–1846
. Andrew Pickens was born in Edgefield County, South Carolina. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. George McDuffie. George McDuffie (August 10, 1790 – March 11, 1851) was a Governor of South Carolina and a member of the United States Senate. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. South Carolina Governor George McDuffie. George McDuffie was born in Columbia County, Georgia. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Pierce Mason Butler. Pierce Mason Butler (April 11, 1798 – August 20, 1847) was an American soldier and statesman who served as Governor of South Carolina from 1836 to 1838. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. South Carolina Governor Pierce Mason Butler. Pierce Mason Butler was born in Mount Willing, Edgefield District, South Carolina. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. James Henry Hammond. James Henry Hammond (November 15, 1807 – November 13, 1864) was a politician from South Carolina. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. South Carolina Governor James Henry Hammond. James Henry Hammond was born in Columbia, South Carolina. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. Francis W. Pickens. Francis Wilkinson Pickens (April 7, 1805 – January 25, 1869) was an American lawyer and politician who served as Governor of South Carolina when the state seceded from the United States during the American Civil War. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

10. South Carolina Governor Francis Wilkinson Pickens
Pierce Mason Butler<br>(1798–1847) image. Click for full size.
By Fitzgerald
4. Pierce Mason Butler
(1798–1847)
Governor of South Carolina 1842-1844
. Francis Wilkinson Pickens was born in St. Paul's Parish, Pendleton District, South Carolina. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

11. Milledge Luke Bonham. Milledge Luke Bonham (December 25, 1813 – August 27, 1890) was a American politician and Congressman who served as the Governor of South Carolina from 1862 until 1864. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

12. South Carolina Governor Milledge Luke Bonham. Milledge Luke Bonham was born in Red Bank, Edgefield District, South Carolina. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

13. John C. Sheppard. John Calhoun Sheppard (July 5, 1850 – October 7, 1931) was Democratic Governor of South Carolina from July 10, 1886 to November 30, 1886. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

14. South Carolina Governor John Calhoun Sheppard. John Calhoun Sheppard was born in Edgefield County, South Carolina. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

15. Ben Tillman. Benjamin Ryan Tillman (August 11, 1847–July 3, 1918) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina, from 1890 to 1894, and as a United States Senator, from 1895 until his death. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

16. South Carolina Governor Benjamin Ryan Tillman. Benjamin Ryan Tillman was born near Trenton, South Carolina. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

17. John Gary Evans. John Gary Evans (October 15, 1863 – June 27, 1942) was Democratic Governor of South Carolina from 1894 to
James Henry Hammond<br>(1807–1864) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
5. James Henry Hammond
(1807–1864)
U.S. House of Representatives from S.C. 1835-1836
Governor of S.C. 1842–1844
U.S. Senator from S.C. 1857–1860
1897. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

18. South Carolina Governor John Gary Evans. John Gary Evans was born in Cokesbury, South Carolina. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

19. Strom Thurmond. James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

20. South Carolina Governor James Strom Thurmond. James Strom Thurmond was born in Edgefield, South Carolina. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

21. Eldred Simkins. Eldred Simkins (August 30, 1779 - November 17, 1831) was a U.S. Representative from South Carolina. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

22. List of Governors of South Carolina. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
23. List of Lieutenant Governors of South Carolina. (Submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
 
Additional comments.
1. George McDuffie (1790-1851)
George McDuffie, (father-in-law of Wade Hampton [1818-1902]), a Representative and a Senator from South Carolina; born in Columbia County, Ga., August 10, 1790; attended an old-field school and a private academy; graduated from South Carolina College (now the University of South Carolina) at Columbia in 1813;
Francis W. Pickens<br>(1805–1869) image. Click for full size.
By Harper's Weekly
6. Francis W. Pickens
(1805–1869)
S.C. House of Representatives 1832–1834
U.S. House of Representatives from S.C. 1834–1843
S.C. Senate 1844-1846
U.S. Minister to Russia 1858–1860
Governor of S.C. 1860-1862
studied law; admitted to the bar in 1814 and commenced practice in Pendleton, Anderson County, S.C.; member, State house of representatives 1818-1819; elected to the Seventeenth and to the six succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1821, until his resignation in 1834; chairman, Committee on Ways and Means (Nineteenth through Twenty-second Congresses); one of the managers appointed by the House of Representatives in 1830 to conduct the impeachment proceedings against James H. Peck; Governor of South Carolina 1834-1836; president of the board of trustees of South Carolina College; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of William C. Preston; reelected, and served from December 23, 1842, until August 17, 1846, when he resigned; chairman, Committee on Foreign Relations (Twenty-ninth Congress); died at ‘Cherry Hill,’ Sumter District (now Sumter County), S.C., March 11, 1851; interment in Cherry Hill Cemetery, Sumter District, S.C. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted January 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Francis Wilkinson Pickens (1805-1869)
Francis Wilkinson Pickens, (grandson of Andrew Pickens), a Representative from South Carolina; born on a plantation on the
Milledge Luke Bonham<br>(1813-1890) image. Click for full size.
By Unknown Source
7. Milledge Luke Bonham
(1813-1890)
U.S. House of Representatives from S.C. 1857–1860
C.S.A. House of Representative from S.C. 1861–1862
Governor of S.C. 1862–1864
Toogoodoo River, St. Paul’s Parish, Colleton District, S.C., April 7, 1805; completed preparatory studies; attended Franklin College, Athens, Ga., and was graduated from South Carolina College (now the University of South Carolina) at Columbia; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Edgefield District in 1829; engaged in planting; member of the state house of representatives 1832-1833; elected as a Nullifier to the Twenty-third Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of George McDuffie; reelected as a Nullifier to the Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth Congresses and elected as a Democrat to the Twenty-sixth and Twenty-seventh Congresses and served from December 8, 1834, to March 3, 1843; chairman, Committee on Foreign Affairs (Twenty-sixth Congress); member of the state senate 1844-1846; member of the Nashville southern convention in 1850; delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1856; unsuccessful candidate for the United States Senate in 1857 to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Andrew P. Butler; Minister to Russia 1858-1860; governor of South Carolina 1860-1862; died in Edgefield, Edgefield County, S.C., January 25, 1869; interment in Edgefield Cemetery. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted January 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South
John Calhoun Sheppard<br>(1850-1931) image. Click for full size.
By Unknown Source
8. John Calhoun Sheppard
(1850-1931)
S.C. House of Representatives 1876-1882
Lieutenant Governor of S.C. 1892-1886
Governor of S.C. 1886–1886
S.C. Senate 1898-1904, 1919-1920
Carolina.

3. Milledge Luke Bonham (1813-1890)
Milledge Luke Bonham, a Representative from South Carolina; born near Red Bank (now Saluda), Edgefield District, S.C., December 25, 1813; attended private schools in Edgefield District and at Abbeville, S.C.; was graduated from South Carolina College (now the University of South Carolina) at Columbia in 1834; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Edgefield in 1837; served as major and adjutant general of the South Carolina Brigade in the Seminole War in Florida in 1836; during the Mexican War was lieutenant colonel and colonel of the Twelfth Regiment, United States Infantry; major general of the South Carolina Militia; member of the State house of representatives 1840-1843; solicitor of the southern circuit of South Carolina 1848-1857; elected as a Democrat to the Thirty-fifth and Thirty-sixth Congresses and served from March 4, 1857, until his retirement on December 21, 1860; appointed major general and commander of the Army of South Carolina by Gov. F. W. Pickens in February 1861; appointed brigadier general in the Confederate Army April 19, 1861; resigned his commission January 27, 1862, to enter the Confederate Congress; elected Governor of South Carolina in December 1862 and served until December 1864; appointed brigadier general of Cavalry in the Confederate
Benjamin Ryan Tillman<br>(1847-1918) image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
9. Benjamin Ryan Tillman
(1847-1918)
Governor of S.C. 1890-1894
U.S. Senator from S.C. 1895–1918
Army in February 1865; again a member of the State house of representatives 1865-1866; delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1868; member of the South Carolina taxpayers’ convention in 1871 and 1874; resumed the practice of law in Edgefield, engaged in planting, and also conducted an insurance business in Edgefield, S.C., and Atlanta, Ga., 1865-1878; appointed State railroad commissioner in 1878 and served until his death at White Sulphur Springs, N.C., August 27, 1890; interment in Elmwood Cemetery, Columbia, S.C. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted January 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

4. Benjamin Ryan Tillman (1847-1918)
Benjamin Ryan Tillman, (brother of George Dionysius Tillman), a Senator from South Carolina; born near Trenton, Edgefield County, S.C., August 11, 1847; pursued an academic course; left school in 1864 to join the Confederate Army, but was stricken with a severe illness; engaged in agricultural pursuits; Governor of South Carolina 1890-1894; established Clemson College and Winthrop College while Governor; member of the State constitutional convention in 1895; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate in 1894; reelected in 1901, 1907 and 1913 and served from March 4, 1895, until his death;
John Gary Evans<br>(1863-1942) image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History, circa 1890
10. John Gary Evans
(1863-1942)
S.C. House of Representatives 1888-1892
S.C. Senate 1892-1894
Governor of S.C. 1894-1897
censured by the Senate in 1902 after assaulting another Senator on the Senate floor; chairman, Committee on Revolutionary Claims (Fifty-seventh through Fifty-ninth Congresses), Committee on Five Civilized Tribes of Indians (Sixty-first and Sixty-second Congresses), Committee on Naval Affairs (Sixty-third through Sixty-fifth Congresses); Tillman was known as “Pitchfork Ben” during his years in the Senate; died in Washington, D.C., July 3, 1918; interment in Ebenezer Cemetery, Trenton, S.C. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted January 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

5. James Strom Thurmond (1902-2003)
James Strom Thurmond, a Senator from South Carolina; born in Edgefield, S.C., December 5, 1902; attended the public schools; graduated, Clemson College 1923; taught in South Carolina high schools 1923-1929; Edgefield County superintendent of education 1929-1933; studied law and was admitted to the South Carolina bar in 1930; city and county attorney 1930-1938; member, State senate 1933-1938; circuit judge 1938-1946; served in the United States Army 1942-1946, in Europe and in the Pacific; major general, United States Army Reserve; Governor of South Carolina 1947-1951; unsuccessful States Rights candidate for President
J. Strom Thurmond<br>(1902–2003) image. Click for full size.
South Carolina State House Collection
11. J. Strom Thurmond
(1902–2003)
S.C. Senate 1933-1938
Circuit Judge 1938-1946
Governor of S.C. 1947-1951
U.S. Senate from S.C. 1954-2003
of the United States in 1948; unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic nomination for United States Senator in 1950; practiced law in Aiken, S.C., 1951-1955; appointed as a Democrat to the United States Senate to complete the term of Charles E. Daniel, who resigned, and served from December 24, 1954, to January 3, 1955; had been previously elected as a write-in candidate in November 1954 for the term commencing January 3, 1955, and ending January 3, 1961, but due to a promise made to the voters in the 1954 election, he resigned as of April 4, 1956; again elected as a Democrat on November 6, 1956 to fill the vacancy caused by his own resignation and took the oath of office on November 7, 1956; reelected in 1960, 1966, 1972, 1978, 1984, 1990 and 1996 and served from November 7, 1956, to January 3, 2003; was not a candidate for reelection in 2002; changed from the Democratic to the Republican Party on September 16, 1964; President pro tempore of the Senate (January 5, 1981-January 5, 1987, January 4, 1995 to January 3, 2001, January 20 to June 6, 2001); President pro tempore emeritus (June 6, 2001-January 3, 2003); chair, Committee on the Judiciary (Ninety-seventh through Ninety-ninth Congresses); Committee on Armed Services (One Hundred Fourth Congresses); turned 100 years old on December 5, 2002, while still in office, the oldest person ever to serve in the U.S. Senate; died in
Eldred Simkins<br>(1779-1831) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
12. Eldred Simkins
(1779-1831)
Lieutenant Governor of S.C. 1812-1814
U.S. House of Representatives from S.C.
1817-1821
S.C. Senate 1821-1826
S.C. House of Representatives 1828-1829
Edgefield, South Carolina on June 26, 2003; interment in Willowbrook Cemetery in Edgefield. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted January 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

6. Eldred Simkins (1779-1831)
Eldred Simkins, a Representative from South Carolina; born in Edgefield, S.C., August 30, 1779; attended a private academy at Willington, Abbeville District, S.C., and was graduated from South Carolina College (now the University of South Carolina) at Columbia; attended Litchfield (Conn.) Law School for three years; was admitted to the bar in 1805 and commenced practice in Edgefield, S.C., in 1806; member of the State house of representatives; served in the State senate 1810-1812; Lieutenant Governor of the State 1812-1814; elected as a Republican to the Fifteenth Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of John C. Calhoun; reelected to the Sixteenth Congress and served from January 24, 1818, to March 3, 1821; chairman, Committee on Public Expenditures (Sixteenth Congress); declined to be a candidate for renomination; again a member of the State house of representatives, 1828-1829; resumed the practice of his profession and also engaged in planting; died in Edgefield, Edgefield County, S.C., November 17, 1831; interment in Cedar Fields, the family burial ground, near Edgefield, S.C. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted January 4, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. GovernmentNotable PersonsPolitics
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,159 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on October 23, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on October 28, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on October 19, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7. submitted on October 23, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   8. submitted on October 19, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   9. submitted on October 24, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   10, 11. submitted on October 18, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   12. submitted on December 26, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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