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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charlton in Saratoga County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John W. Taylor

 
 
John W. Taylor Birthplace Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, November 9, 2018
1. John W. Taylor Birthplace Marker
Inscription.  Birthplace of John W. Taylor Mar. 1784 -Sept. 1854 Twice Speaker -U.S. House of Representatives N.Y. Senator-Assemblyman.
 
Erected by Charlton Historical Society.
 
Location. 42° 56.15′ N, 73° 56.688′ W. Marker is in Charlton, New York, in Saratoga County. Marker is at the intersection of Charlton Road and Valentine Road on Charlton Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ballston Lake NY 12019, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Charlton (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Charlton (approx. mile away); Charlton Museum (approx. 0.8 miles away); a different marker also named Charlton (approx. 0.8 miles away); Pine Grove (approx. one mile away); Charlton Academy (approx. one mile away); Presbyterian Church (approx. 1.1 miles away); a different marker also named Charlton (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charlton.
 
Regarding John W. Taylor. John Taylor was born March 26, 1784, and he was the son of Judge John Taylor. He graduated
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from Union College in 1803 and soon thereafter married Jane Hodges, with whom he had 8 children. Taylor was elected to Congress in 1813 as a Democratic-Republican, and he would serve the next twenty years there. He was a abolitionist, and he and fellow New York Congressman, James Tallmadge, were the first propose measures to curtain the westward expansion of slavery into new states and territories. Taylor proposed the use of the Mason-Dixon line as the geographic boundary of slavery in the Missouri Compromise. Taylor was Speaker of the House in 1821 for the 16th Congress, and in 1825 for the 19th Congress.
Taylor's anti-slavery stance aligned him with John Quincy Adams and Henry Clay, and this caused him difficulty in New York in the fight between President Andrew Jackson ally Martin Van Buren and New York Governor Dewitt Clinton in 1833. Taylor returned to New York and served in the State Assembly until he suffered a paralytic stroke in 1842. He retired to his daughter's home in Cleveland, Ohio and remained in her care until his death in 1854.
 
Also see . . .
1. Speaker of the House Biography. (Submitted on November 25, 2018, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York.)
2. Guide to the papers of John W. Taylor- New York Historical Society and Museum Library. (Submitted on November 25, 2018, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York.)
3. John W. Taylor - Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
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(Submitted on November 27, 2018, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Politics
 

More. Search the internet for John W. Taylor.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 27, 2018. This page originally submitted on November 25, 2018, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. This page has been viewed 44 times since then and 22 times this year. Photo   1. submitted on November 25, 2018, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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