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Kinloss in Moray, Scotland, United Kingdom
 

The Cistercians of Kinloss

 
 
The Cistercians of Kinloss Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 1, 2018
1. The Cistercians of Kinloss Marker
Inscription.
The Cistercians of Kinloss
Cistercian monastic observance followed the Rule of St Benedict, insisting on plain clothing, two simple meals a day, and an austerity in church furnishings 'in places far from the concourse of men'. They developed an economy based on the direct exploitation of land and became wealthy institutions. To enable the Cistercians to fulfil their spiritual role, lay brethren were encouraged into the monastery to work taking vows along with the monks, providing them with a security that must have been an appealing prospect in times of rising population and shortages of land.

The Daily Round of Work and Prayer
“Seven times a day do I praise thee”
Worship in Church
Matins/Lauds
Prime
Terce
Chapter House
Sect
None
Vespers
Compline


Husbandry of Animals   The Bedford Hours, Paris c1423   By permission of the British Library Cultivation of Crops   The Tres Riche Heures of the Duc de Barry c1413   Courtesy of Musee Conde, Chantilly Fishing the Findhorn   Manuscript Dante Divina Comedia Florence c1412   Courtesy of H.P. Kraus, New York Copying Manuscripts   Tripartite Psalter with Gloss Cznterbury c1150   Courtesy of Trinity College Cambridge Administering the Lands   Hugh of St Victor, late 12th C   By
The Cistercians of Kinloss Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 1, 2018
2. The Cistercians of Kinloss Marker
permission of the Bodleian Library, Oxford Music & the Arts   Cotton, Microsoft Vespasian AI F.30v Psalter   By permission of the British Library Hospitality Food & Drink   Sloane Microsoft 2435, F.44  By permission of the British Library Building the Abbey   The Bedford Hours, Paris c1423   By permission of the British Library

The Abbey Community
Superiors:
Abbot   Elected or nominated head of the Abbey with absolute authority
Prior   Second in command
Sub Prior   Assistant to the Prior
Sacristan   Responsible for the church, fittings, ornaments and clothes
Cantor   Responsible for the service conducted in the church
Master of Novices   Responsible for the training and guidance of all novices
Cellarer   Responsible for the care and distribution of food and drink
Kitchener   Supervises all cooking
Refectorian   Ensures refectory and Lavatorium were ready for ise
Guest Master   Responsible for all travellers and guests
Porter   Head of security
Almoner   Responsible for giving alms to the poor and needy
Infirmarian   Responsible for the infirmary and its occupants
Chamberlain   Ensures that the monks get clean clothes and bedding
Choir Monks   Spend much of the day in prayer, study and literary work
Lay Brothers   Spend day of labour around the Abbey or surrounding lands

The
Ruins of Kinloss Abbey image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 1, 2018
3. Ruins of Kinloss Abbey
Mother House
Kinloss Abbey was founded from Melrose Abbey in 1150, itself a Daughter House of the great Rievaulx Abbey in Yorkshire. Located near the border with England, Melrose suffered greatly under the hands of successive English Monarchs, damaged by Edward II in 1322 and then by Richard II in 1385.
The heart of Robert the Bruce was buried at Melrose.

The Daughter Houses
As a result of the size and stature of Kinloss, the Abbot was able to found two new monasteries. In 1217 Culross Abbey, Fife was established followed in 1219 by Deer Abbey, Aberdeenshire. Each Abbey required Kinloss to provide an Abbot plus twelve monks.

Significant Abbots
Kinloss had twenty four Abbots in all, of which the following made a major contribution during their time.
1151   Anselm created as the first Abbot
1395   Adam of Teras 15th Abbot
  • Started building the Abbots Hall
  • Abbacy granted Mitre with seat in Parliament
  • Scandal spreads with accounts of immoral lives of the Abbot and monks
1440   John Ellam 18th Abbot
  • Brought many gifts and commenced repairs to the fabric of the monastery
  • Planned a Bell Tower to stand above the choir of the church
1504   Thomas Chrystall 22nd Abbot
  • Spent his office putting right all that had deteriorated over the previous 1oo years
  • Sent many monks
The Cistercians of Kinloss Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 1, 2018
4. The Cistercians of Kinloss Marker
away to be properly educated and introduced twelve new monks to the Abbot
1531   Robert Reid 23rd Abbot
  • Most prolific and highly respected of the Abbots. Resolved numerous legal battles between the Abbey and local towns
  • Renovated and expanded the Abbey including the building of a library
  • Commissioned new works of art by Andrew Bairtrum, introduced 123 varieties of Pear and 146 varieties of Apple
  • Ambassador to the King, Lord President of the Court of Session
  • Later became Bishop of Orkney
  • Introduced structured education to Scotland and founded the University of Edinburgh
1553   Walter Reid 24th and last Abbot and nephew of Robert
  • Signed the Reformation of Parliament bringing an end to the Monasteries
  • Subsequently maintained control of Abbey and grounds, took himself a wife and raised a family
  • Gave away much of the Abbey lands and plundered the rest until his death in 1589

Royal Visitors
Monasteries would provide accommodation to whoever asked. This was the case when King Edward I and his invading army stayed at Kinloss in 1303. During their two week stay they consumed a years worth of food and drink. In 1336 Edward III stayed at Kinloss for a week whilst laying siege to Lochindorb Castle. Mary Queen of Scots stayed three nights at Kinloss during her tour of the North in 1562.

( photo captions )
- Melrose Abbey by Slezer   Courtesy of The National Library of Scotland
- Culross Abbey by Slezer   Courtesy of The National Library of Scotland
- Charter prepared by Robert Reid for Debatable Lands in the borders under Commission from Henry VIII
- Artist unknown   Mary, Queen of Scots   The Scottish National Portrait Gallery
 
Location. 57° 38.027′ N, 3° 33.989′ W. Marker is in Kinloss, Scotland, in Moray. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Scotland Route B9089 and Scotland Route B9011, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Kinloss, Scotland IV36 3TL, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Five Centuries in Kinloss (within shouting distance of this marker); Kinloss Abbey (within shouting distance of this marker); Kinloss War Memorial (approx. 3.6 kilometers away); Findhorn Tercentenary (approx. 3.6 kilometers away); Benjamin MacLean (approx. 8.8 kilometers away); Burghead War Memorial (approx. 8.8 kilometers away); The Harvest Reaper (approx. 8.9 kilometers away); Fortune’s Beacon (approx. 9 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Kinloss.
 
Also see . . .  Kinloss Abbey on Wikipedia. (Submitted on January 1, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Churches & Religion
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 1, 2019. This page originally submitted on January 1, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 34 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 1, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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