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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbus in Colorado County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Colorado County

City of Columbus

 
 
Colorado County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, February 18, 2019
1. Colorado County Marker
Inscription.  Site of projected capitol of
Stephen F. Austin's colony, 1823.

First settlement at this point shown on
Stephen F. Austin's map of 1835 as Montezuma.

The municipality of Colorado was created by the
provisional government of Texas January 11, 1836
and the town of Columbus ordered laid out as
the seat of government.

On March 17, 1836 the county of Colorado was created;
in 1837, it was organized.

Columbus, the county seat, was incorporated June 5, 1837.

As a railroad terminal, from 1869 to 1873,
Columbus was an important trading center
for a large territory to the west.

In memory of

The pioneer families of Burnam, Gilleland, Cummins,
Fisher, DeWees, Kuykendall and Tumlinson.

J. W. E. Wallace and his company
who defended Gonzales October 2, 1835.

William D. Lacey, William Menefee,
signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence.

Leander Beason, John P. Borden, David Cole, Stephen
T. Foley, George W. Gardner, S. Joseph Garwood,
Basil G. Ijams, Dr. James D. Jennings, Alfred Kelso,
Amos
Colorado County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, February 18, 2019
2. Colorado County Marker
D. Kenyon, Daniel Miller, James Nelson,
Mitchell Putnam, Dempsey Pace, William Pace, Washing-
ton H. Secrest, Maxwell Steel, Robert Stevenson,
Spencer B. Townsend, William Waters, Leroy Wilkinson,
San Jacinto veterans who lived in this county
prior to or after the Texas Revolution.

Col. John C. Upton, Major John S. Shropshire,
Major J. S. West, Capt. P. J. Oakes, Capt. James D. Roberdeau,
Capt. R. V. Cook, Confederate officers.

The following citizens of distinction have
resided in Colorado County

Jones Rivers, jurist; Dr. Lawrence Washington,
Gail Borden, Matthew Stanley Quay, Senator for
Pennsylvania; Chas. Nagel, cabinet minister under Taft,
Wells Thompson, Lieutenant Governor of Texas,
George McCormick, State Attorney General and
co-writer of the present State Constitution,
Geo. W. Smith, member of Supreme Court of Texas.
 
Erected 1936 by the State of Texas. (Marker Number 974.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Texas 1936 Centennial Markers and Monuments marker series.
 
Location. 29° 42.367′ N, 96° 32.415′ W. Marker is in Columbus, Texas, in Colorado County. Marker is on Milam Street (State Highway 52 Spur), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located on the west side of the courthouse square. Marker is at or near this postal address: 400 Spring Street, Columbus TX 78934, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Colorado County Courthouse (a few steps from this marker); William Menefee (within shouting distance of this marker); Ehrenwerth-Ramsey-Untermeyer Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Columbus State Bank (within shouting distance of this marker); 1890 Cornerstone Ceremony (within shouting distance of this marker); Confederate Memorial Museum (within shouting distance of this marker); The Rangers of Austin's Colony (within shouting distance of this marker); Tumlinson Family (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Columbus.
 
Also see . . .  Colorado County - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on February 27, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.) 
 
Categories. Political Subdivisions
 
More. Search the internet for Colorado County.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 1, 2019. This page originally submitted on February 27, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 45 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 28, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.
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