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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Bliss in El Paso County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

AH-1F COBRA Attack Helicopter

 
 
AH-1F COBRA Attack Helicopter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2014
1. AH-1F COBRA Attack Helicopter Marker
Inscription.  The lethal Vietnam era AH-1 Cobra gunship first saw combat in 1967. The last of the modernized AH-1 (F) left the Army National Guard in 2001. The Cobra specializes in close ground support and tank killing. The United States Marine Corps currently fly the AH-1W Super Cobra on active service.
 
Location. 31° 49.31′ N, 106° 25.773′ W. Marker is in Fort Bliss, Texas, in El Paso County. Marker is on Marshall Road 0.7 miles north of Cassidy Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker and subject helicopter are located on Fort Bliss Army Base, within the large military equipment exhibit directly in front of the Fort Bliss & Old Ironsides Museum entrance. The exhibit and museum are generally open to the public during normal business hours, after gaining clearance and access through the Fort Bliss main gate. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1735 Marshall Road, El Paso TX 79906, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. V2 Rocket (a few steps from this marker); "General of the Army Omar N. Bradley Flagpole" (within shouting distance of this marker); Mexican War Refugee Camp
AH-1F COBRA Attack Helicopter Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2014
2. AH-1F COBRA Attack Helicopter Marker (wide view)
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pearl Harbor Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); Building 1372 (approx. half a mile away); Building 1355 (approx. half a mile away); Second Expansion Period Group (approx. 0.6 miles away); Historical Building 241 - The Guardhouse, 1893 (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Bliss.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a painted and somewhat weathered metal plaque, mounted horizontally on a waist-high post.
 
Also see . . .
1. AH-1F Cobra Attack Helicopter (1967-1986). The AH-1 Cobra series was the first purpose-made attack helicopter in the US Army, and for many years the only Western helicopter with proven air-to-air and anti-radar missile capabilities. Originally designed to escort vulnerable transport helicopters in the Vietnam War, its uses quickly expanded due to its agility and lethality. It played an active role in every major military intervention until the late 1990s, after which it was offered to NATO allies as well as the US Forest Service to fight wildfires. (Submitted on March 1, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Bell AH-1 Cobra. The AH-1 was the backbone of the United States Army's attack helicopter fleet, but has been replaced
AH-1F COBRA Attack Helicopter image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2014
3. AH-1F COBRA Attack Helicopter
by the AH-64 Apache in Army service. Upgraded versions continue to fly with the militaries of several other nations. The AH-1 twin-engine versions remain in service with United States Marine Corps (USMC) as the service's primary attack helicopter. (Submitted on March 1, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Air & SpaceMilitaryWar, Vietnam
 
AH-1F COBRA Attack Helicopter (<i>side view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 5, 2014
4. AH-1F COBRA Attack Helicopter (side view)
 
More. Search the internet for AH-1F COBRA Attack Helicopter.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 1, 2019. This page originally submitted on March 1, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 41 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on March 1, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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