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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Flippin in Monroe County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Pikesville

 
 
Pikesville Marker image. Click for full size.
By C. R. Arterburn, 2015
1. Pikesville Marker
Inscription.  The proprietary town of "Pikesville" was established here with 10 streets and public square in August, 1818, east of Pikesville Branch and north of "Old Pikeville Rd" on 75 acres of land granted to Thomas Flippin in 1798. Pikesville was narrowly defeated in the election for county seat of Monroe in 1820. The town included a church, school, stores, taverns, grist mill, smithy, tannery, and racetrack. Samuel Johns[t]on with sons James and Nathan[iel] acquired all of the "Pikeville land" (353 acres) from Rev. Dr. John B. Cothran in 1855.

Pikesville School #1 1855-1929
Pikeville School #2 1929-1951
Bethel M.E. Church 1847-1923

A Forgotten Town Remembered: Pikesville of Monroe County, Kentucky (Charles R. Arterburn)
Flippin Family Association (Nova A. Lemons)
 
Erected 2017.
 
Location. 36° 44.005′ N, 85° 53.351′ W. Marker is near Flippin, Kentucky, in Monroe County. Marker is on Flippin Lamb Road (Route 249), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located at the junction

Old Pikeville Road image. Click for full size.
By C. R. Arterburn, 2015
2. Old Pikeville Road
Co-located with "Pikesville" marker (a.k.a. Tompkinsville-Pikeville-Gallatin Road)
of an historic section of "Old Pikeville Rd" with Kentucky Route (Highway) 249, approximately 1.25 miles north of Flippin, Kentucky. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1890 Flippin Lamb Road, Tompkinsville KY 42167, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Daniel Boone Was Here (here, next to this marker); Famous Tree / Indian Creek Church (approx. 1.3 miles away); Fraim Cemetery (approx. 1.6 miles away); Camp Anderson (approx. 2.6 miles away); Fountain Run World War I & World War II Memorial (approx. 4.4 miles away); Free-Town Church (approx. 6.4 miles away); Gamaliel Cemetery (approx. 8.1 miles away); Gamaliel (approx. 8.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Flippin.
 
Also see . . .
1. Flippin, Kentucky (Wikipedia). (Submitted on December 23, 2018, by C. R. Arterburn of Bowling Green, Kentucky.)
2. A Forgotten Town Remembered: Pikesville of Monroe County, Kentucky. (Submitted on December 27, 2018, by C. R. Arterburn of Bowling Green, Kentucky.)
3. Old Pikesville Cemetery. (Submitted on December 29, 2018, by C. R. Arterburn of Bowling Green, Kentucky.)
4. The Flippin Files. (Submitted on December 30, 2018, by C. R. Arterburn of Bowling Green, Kentucky.)
5. Johnson-Cross Cemetery. (Submitted on December 31, 2018, by C. R. Arterburn of Bowling Green, Kentucky.)
 
Additional comments.
Old Pikesville Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By C. R. Arterburn, 2015
3. Old Pikesville Cemetery
Located opposite the junction of Old Pikeville Road with Highway 249. All gravesites are unmarked.
1. Thomas H. Flippin 1793-1856

................

“During the period 1799-1807, Thomas Flippin [1740-1830] and sons, William and James, applied for grants of unclaimed Kentucky land administered by the Commonwealth as the “Grants South of Green River,” altogether totaling 2,150 acres. [12] The Flippin grants were located [in Barren County, after 1798, Monroe County, after 1820] on or near the watercourses of Indian Creek, White Oak Creek, and the East Fork of Big Barren River. Of the total, 1,150 acres were granted or assigned to Thomas Flippin. ... [O]n April 27, 1818, Thomas Flippin Sr. and his sons, James and Isaac Flippin, jointly conveyed to John Baugh, William Baugh, and son Thomas H. Flippin [14] a 353-acre tract on the “waters of Indian Creek” [Pikesville Branch] from which the original 75-acre town of Pikesville would be created.” (Arterburn, 2014, pp. 17, 23)

———————

“Thomas H. Flippin, along with [three] of his brothers were Volunteers in the Kentucky Mounted Militia during the War of 1812.

“At the end of the War of 1812, Thomas H. Flippin married Elizabeth Baugh on 29 November 1816 in Barren County, Kentucky. They had two sons, William Baugh Flippin and Thomas Haggard Perry Flippin.

“In 1837, Thomas H. Flippin, with other
Thomas H. Flippin 1793-1856 image. Click for full size.
By Thomas H. Flippin Chapter, NSUSD of 1812
4. Thomas H. Flippin 1793-1856
(Flippin Cemetery, Flippin, Arkansas)
family members, relocated to Northern Arkansas. ... The land was named Flippin Barrens, later named Flippin, Arkansas.

“Thomas H. Flippin was a prosperous member of the community. He was the Marion County Clerk and very involved in the Church. He applied for land grants related to the War of 1812.

“Thomas H. Flippin passed away on 6 March 1856 in Marion County, Arkansas. He was buried in the Flippin Cemetery, which was part of his original farm. The Flippin Cemetery is still present today with many generations of the Flippin family interred at the site.”

— “Who Was Thomas H. Flippin?” Thomas H. Flippin Chapter, United States Daughters of 1812, Bella Vista, Arkansas. December 27, 2018. http://sites.usdaughters1812.org/flippin1812/ Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted December 29, 2018, by C. R. Arterburn of Bowling Green, Kentucky.

2. How Pikesville Got Its Name
Although not documented, Pikesville was almost certainly named for General Zebulon Pike (1779-1813), hero of the War of 1812 who had died in the Battle of York. Thomas H. Flippin, his father in law, William Baugh, and Rev. John Baugh were the founding proprietors who duly petitioned Barren County Court to establish the town of Pikesville, and who would have decided its name. Sergeant Thomas H. Flippin and three of his brothers, William, James, and John, had recently served in Captain Hugh Brown’s Company of the 1st Regiment of Kentucky Mounted Militia during that War. Honoring Zebulon Pike as a namesake in various forms for place names (e.g., Pikeville, Pike County, Pike’s Peak) was popular after the War, but only two historical instances of the spelling of “Pikesville” to honor Pike are known: Pikesville, Maryland, and Pikesville, Kentucky. Thomas H. Flippin also apparently named his son, Thomas H. Perry Flippin (1819-1885), for another hero of the War of 1812, Commodore Oliver H. Perry (1785-1819).
    — Submitted January 2, 2019, by C. R. Arterburn of Bowling Green, Kentucky.

 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismSettlements & SettlersWar of 1812
 
More. Search the internet for Pikesville.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 7, 2019. This page originally submitted on December 22, 2018, by C. R. Arterburn of Bowling Green, Kentucky. This page has been viewed 139 times since then and 55 times this year. Last updated on March 6, 2019, by C. R. Arterburn of Bowling Green, Kentucky. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 22, 2018, by C. R. Arterburn of Bowling Green, Kentucky.   4. submitted on December 29, 2018, by C. R. Arterburn of Bowling Green, Kentucky. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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