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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Linden in Warren County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Camp Dismal Hollow

 
 
Camp Dismal Hollow Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 8, 2019
1. Camp Dismal Hollow Marker
Inscription.  
The Corps Comes to Virginia

In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized the creation of a nationwide program intended to alleviate unemployment resulting from The Great Depression. Unmarried men ages 18-25 were offered construction jobs in exchange for 3 meals a day, clothing, and $30 wages a month ($25 of which was sent directly to their families). The first camp, Camp Roosevelt, opened in Virginia in June 1933 and thousands of camps followed throughout the country. Camp Dismal Hollow opened in 1935 on the land on which you are currently standing. The Dismal Hollow men built the Front Royal Golf Club; worked on the overlook and roadbed of Skyline Drive; planted trees in Shenandoah National Park; tended plant nurseries; and helped construct the Warren County Courthouse, lawn of Front Royal Town Hall, and Warren County Fish Hatchery.

Life at Camp

Most camps housed about 200 men, many of whom arrived malnourished and under-educated due to economic hardship. A typical day started at 6:00 a.m. with breakfast and bunk inspection. Then, they were off to work from 8:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m.
Camp Dismal Hollow Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 8, 2019
2. Camp Dismal Hollow Marker
followed by dinner and lights out at 10:00 p.m. Enrollees thrived on regular meals, military-like discipline, physical labor, and educational opportunities provided by the CCC. In their free time, the men often played sports, visited nearby towns, and went on the occasional date.

National CCC Legacy

Between 1933 and 1942, 3 million CCC men planted over 3 billion trees, developed 800 state parks, built 125,000 mile of road, and taught more than 40,000 illiterate enrollees to read and write.
 
Erected by Warren County Department of Parks and Recreation.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civilian Conservation Corps marker series.
 
Location. 38° 55.356′ N, 78° 7.388′ W. Marker is in Linden, Virginia, in Warren County. Marker can be reached from Dismal Hollow Road (Virginia Route 647) south of Oregon Hollow Road (Virginia Route 603), on the right when traveling north. This marker is in Linden Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1759 Dismal Hollow Road, Linden VA 22642, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Battle of Manassas Gap (approx. 0.9 miles away); Warren County/Fauquier County (approx. 2.7 miles away); Discovery Shenandoah Valley
Camp Dismal Hollow image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 8, 2019
3. Camp Dismal Hollow
Like most camps, Dismal Hollow was built according to standard CCC specifications and included the typical administration building, housing barracks, officer's quarters, showers, latrines, mess hall, infirmary, education center, workshops, recreation hall, and flagpole. Building designs were essentially the same across the county in order to minimize cost and construction time.
Close-up of map and photos on marker
courtesy of Lucy Virginia Hale Archives.
(approx. 2.7 miles away); Bel Air (approx. 3 miles away); Front Royal (approx. 3.6 miles away); a different marker also named Front Royal (approx. 3.6 miles away); The Courthouse (approx. 3.8 miles away); Capture of Front Royal (approx. 3.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Linden.
 
Categories. Government & Politics
 
Men of Dismal Hollow image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 8, 2019
4. Men of Dismal Hollow
In addition to regular enrollees who performed construction, each camp had members with special skills, including medical stall officers and administrative personnel, skilled laborers from surrounding towns who taught the men how to perform their work, literacy education officers, and chaplains for religious services.
Close-up of photo on marker
courtesy of Lucy Virginia Hale Archives.
Barracks image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 8, 2019
5. Barracks
Camps were run according to military rules and expected to be kept neat—inspections were frequent. The men took great pride in the appearance of their buildings and grounds, including their bunks.
Close-up of photo on marker
courtesy of Lucy Virginia Hale Archives.
Recreation Hall image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 8, 2019
6. Recreation Hall
With their extra spending money, the men able to visit the camp store to buy candy, soda, toiletries, and other personal items. They enjoyed watching movies, ping pong, billiards, playing music and sports, and relaxing in the recreation hall.
Close-up of photo on marker
courtesy of Lucy Virginia Hale Archives.
Woodworking Shop image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 8, 2019
7. Woodworking Shop
A secondary goal of the CCC program was to educate the young men who lived at the camps. After the work day was complete, the men were often taught to read and write, finish high school classes, and learn trades such as carpentry and masonry.
Close-up of photo on marker
courtesy of Lucy Virginia Hale Archives.
Warren County Department of Parks and Recreation image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 8, 2019
8. Warren County Department of Parks and Recreation
 

More. Search the internet for Camp Dismal Hollow.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 30, 2019. This page originally submitted on May 29, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 112 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on May 29, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   2. submitted on May 30, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on May 29, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   8. submitted on May 30, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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