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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oakland in Garrett County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

1920 Baldwin Steam Locomotive

 
 
1920 Baldwin Steam Locomotive Marker image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, June 17, 2019
1. 1920 Baldwin Steam Locomotive Marker
Inscription.  This 1920 locomotive was originally built by the Baldwin Locomotive works for the Jonesboro, Lake City and Eastern Railroad in Mississippi. The locomotive originally carried the number 40, but was changed to #76 in 1925, when it was leased to the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad. In 1947 it was sold to the Mississippian Railway, owned and operated by two brothers, Jim and Frank Carlisle, who own two identical locomotives that they kept in tip-top condition.

In 1967 a man by the name of Sloan Cornell purchased locomotive #76 for the service on his Penn View Mountain scenic railroad in Pennsylvania. Here it was put to the test by climbing a steep 4% grade, while negotiating "switch backs," to reach a scenic overlook. In 1976, Mr. Cornell closed his Penn View Mountain railway, and moved his entire operation to the Gettysburg area, where he operated the Gettysburg Scenic Railway. While running on the Gettysburg line, Engine #76 reportedly began a steady decline, due in part to corrosion caused by the hard water it ingested over a span of about 20 years. It is said that #76 was "out of square, patched up, and one very tired 1920 Baldwin"
1920 Baldwin Steam Locomotive Marker (left half) image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, June 17, 2019
2. 1920 Baldwin Steam Locomotive Marker (left half)
when she was taken out of service on the Gettysburg line. After sitting idle for several years, the locomotive was sold to the Steam Railroading Institute at Owosso, Michigan in 2005. Here it began a restoration process that was ultimately abandoned in favor of another locomotive.

In December, 2017 the Oakland B&O Museum received a generous donation from the Daniel E. Offurt III Charitable Trust, for the purpose of acquiring a steam locomotive for display in front of the 1884 Oakland Train Station. After an extensive search, the Oakland B&O Museum found and purchased Engine #76 from the Steam Railroading Institute. It was moved from Michigan to Oakland in July, 2018, and restored for display purposes by Diversified Rail Services, Inc. While this engine was never actually used on the B&O Railroad line, once it was moved to Oakland, a town rich in B&O history, a decision was made to adopt it as a B&O Engine. In researching the history of B&O steam engines, it was determined that Engine #76 most closely resembled the B&O class E-39 steam engines in certain respects, including wheel configuration, driver diameter, cylinder bore/stroke, gross tonnage, and operating boiler pressure. Also the B&O engines of that era were assigned numbers in the "400" series. So the number 476 was chosen for the adopted engine, employing the number 4 from its original identity, and the number
1920 Baldwin Steam Locomotive Marker (right half) image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, June 17, 2019
3. 1920 Baldwin Steam Locomotive Marker (right half)
76 which it carried for most of its working life. The Oakland B&O Museum is pleased to have had the opportunity to preserve this piece of railroad history for future generations.

(Image of Engine #76.)
#76 in service on the Mississippian Railway.

(Logo for Oaktown, Maryland)
 
Erected by Oakland, Maryland.
 
Location. 39° 24.613′ N, 79° 24.537′ W. Marker is in Oakland, Maryland, in Garrett County. Marker is at the intersection of E Liberty Street and s 1st Street, on the right when traveling south on E Liberty Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 117 E Liberty Street, Oakland MD 21550, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1884 Oakland Train Station (within shouting distance of this marker); Oakland (within shouting distance of this marker); Gettysburg Campaign (within shouting distance of this marker); Railroad Street (within shouting distance of this marker); The Glades Hotel (within shouting distance of this marker); Garrett Memorial Church (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Welcome to Dailey’s Park (about 400 feet away); MaryLandscapes (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oakland.
 
Categories. Railroads & Streetcars
 
1920 Baldwin Steam Locomotive Marker, Our Benefactors Marker, Engine 476. image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, June 17, 2019
4. 1920 Baldwin Steam Locomotive Marker, Our Benefactors Marker, Engine 476.
1920 Baldwin Steam Locomotive Marker, Our Benefactors Marker, Engine 476. image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, June 17, 2019
5. 1920 Baldwin Steam Locomotive Marker, Our Benefactors Marker, Engine 476.
1920 Baldwin Steam Locomotive Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Lassman, June 17, 2019
6. 1920 Baldwin Steam Locomotive Marker
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on June 24, 2019. This page originally submitted on June 22, 2019. This page has been viewed 40 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 22, 2019. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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