Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Honolulu in Honolulu County, Hawaii — Hawaiian Island Archipelago (Pacific Ocean)
 

Aliiolani Hale

 

—State of Hawaii Historic Marker —

 
Aliiolani Hale Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
1. Aliiolani Hale Marker
Inscription. Originally designed as a palace, it was built by Kamehameha V to house the legislature, courts and cabinet offices of the Kingdom. He died not long after laying the cornerstone and the building was given his name Aliiolani. It was formally opened by Kalakaua for the legislative session of 1874.

A revolutionary committee occupied the building on January 17, 1893 and proclaimed here the overthrow of the Monarchy and formation of the Provisional Government. Since then it has served as judiciary building for the Republic, Territory, and State.
 
Location. 21° 18.333′ N, 157° 51.592′ W. Marker is in Honolulu, Hawaii, in Honolulu County. Marker is on South King Street north of Punchbowl Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. It is at the front entrance to the building. Marker is at or near this postal address: 417 S King St, Honolulu HI 96813, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. King Kamehameha I (within shouting distance of this marker); Iolani Palace (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); King William Charles Lunalilo
Aliiolani Hale Historic Marker at Building Entrance image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
2. Aliiolani Hale Historic Marker at Building Entrance
(about 600 feet away); Kawaiaha‘o Landmark (about 700 feet away); Kawaiaha'o Church (about 800 feet away); Hiram Bingham (about 800 feet away); a different marker also named Kawaiaha'o Landmark (approx. 0.2 miles away); Reverend James Kekela (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Honolulu.
 
Also see . . .  Hale Was First Meant to Be a Palace. 2004 article by Burl Burlingame in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin. “In the 1893 revolution, the Provisional Government read their declaration in Ali‘iolani Hale. This event signaled the end of the Hawaiian monarchy, and government services were shifted out of Ali‘iolani Hale and into Iolani Palace to underscore the point. The Judiciary branch moved in and has been there ever since. The Judiciary History Center, currently on the Diamond Head side of the first floor, provides an interesting overview of Hawaiian legal history.” (Submitted on November 14, 2008.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Aliʻiōlani Hale image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, October 23, 2008
3. Aliʻiōlani Hale
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 14, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,289 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 14, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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