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Malvern in Chester County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Malvern Memorial Parade

 
 
Malvern Memorial Parade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 6, 2008
1. Malvern Memorial Parade Marker
Inscription. In 1817, nearly 40 years after the Revolutionary War, the first parade commemorating the anniversary of the Paoli Massacre was held. More than 400 volunteer troops participated “in a slow solemn march.”

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, an organization of former Union soldiers and sailors – the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) – established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. The first large observance was held that year on May 30 at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C.

The Malvern Memorial Parade draws its heritage from these two commemorations. Tradition says the first Malvern Parade was held in 1869, the oldest continuing Memorial Parade in the country. Today, the Upper Main Line Veterans of Foreign Wars Post # 5203 is the host veteran organization and the Parade is sponsored by the Upper Main Line Memorial Association.

From the beginning, the idea of a Decoration Day parade rapidly grew in popularity, as local veterans posts sought to have their own parades. Malvern, West Chester and Wayne were no exception. It was from this dilemma that the specific day of the Malvern Parade was established. Early on, the three communities decided that West Chester would hold their parade the day before, Wayne the
Marker on the Paoli Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 6, 2008
2. Marker on the Paoli Battlefield
day of, and Malvern the Sunday after Decoration Day (now Memorial Day). That tradition has been maintained ever since. And each year the parade ends at this site with patriotic addresses, band music and quite often a reenactment.
 
Erected by Paoli Memorial Association.
 
Location. 40° 1.784′ N, 75° 31.161′ W. Marker is in Malvern, Pennsylvania, in Chester County. Marker is on Monument Avenue, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is on the Paoli Battlefield. Marker is in this post office area: Malvern PA 19355, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Malvern Area World War I Memorial (here, next to this marker); Paoli Veterans Monument (a few steps from this marker); Malvern World War II Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Paoli (a few steps from this marker); “Remember Paoli!” (within shouting distance of this marker); "We bury’d our Dead next day in the field of Battle, All kill’d by the sword and Bayonet." (within shouting distance of this marker); This Wall (within shouting distance of this marker); Paoli Massacre Monument (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Malvern.
 
More about this marker. The right
Malvern Memorial Parade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 6, 2008
3. Malvern Memorial Parade Marker
side of the marker contains a copy of a publication about Camp Wayne (artwork courtesy of the National Bank of Malvern). The illustration, originally published by Huddy and Duval, No. 7 Bank Alley, opposite the Exchange, Philadelphia, features a picture of soldiers at Fort Wayne, with the caption, “Pennsylvania Volunteers Encampment on the Paoli Battle Ground Sept. 19th, 20th, 21st, & 22nd, 1840.” Also present is a picture of a facsimile of the monument, erected by the Troops of Chester County, with the assistance of local Malvern citizens. The illustration lists the names of officials, including Governor Gen. David R. Porter and Aids, General Jones, and Adam Diller, Adjutant General, and the staff and companies of right and left wings.
The bottom of the marker contains a photograph of a military honor guard on the Paoli Grounds, courtesy of Dr. Wiley Behler.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This series of markers follow the walking trail of the Paoli Battlefield.
 
Also see . . .  Paoli Battlefield - Paoli Massacre. Paoli Battlefield website. (Submitted on November 19, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. Notable PlacesPatriots & Patriotism
 
Malvern Memorial Parade Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 6, 2008
4. Malvern Memorial Parade Marker
In addition to hosting the annual Malvern Memorial Parade, these grounds were the Revolutionary War encampment of Gen. Anthony Wayne and the site of the Paoli Massacre of September 20, 1777. It also served as a drilling ground prior to the Mexican War and a Camp of Instruction for troops early in the Civil War.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 19, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,269 times since then and 40 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 19, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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