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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Tuskegee Airmen of World War II

They Accepted the Challenge

 
 
The Tuskegee Airmen of World War II Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 30, 2008
1. The Tuskegee Airmen of World War II Marker
Inscription. Two hundred strategic bomber escort missions over Europe with the 15th Air Force without the loss of a single bomber to enemy aircraft, 1944-45, a record unsurpassed.

Dedicated in their memory, 10 November 1995.
 
Erected 1995.
 
Location. 38° 52.627′ N, 77° 4.471′ W. Marker is in Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia, in Arlington County. Touch for map. Marker is located off Farragut Drive in Cemetery Section 46. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Myer VA 22211, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Exercise Tiger Memorial (a few steps from this marker); U. S. Army Reserves (a few steps from this marker); Merrill's Marauders (within shouting distance of this marker); Canadian Cross of Sacrifice (within shouting distance of this marker); Landing Craft Support Ships (within shouting distance of this marker); Vietnamese Rangers and Their American Ranger Advisors (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. War Correspondent (within shouting distance of this marker); United States Space Shuttle Challenger (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Arlington National Cemetery.
 
Related markers.
The Tuskegee Airmen marker and memorial tree image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 30, 2008
2. The Tuskegee Airmen marker and memorial tree
ANC Section 24.
Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, Alabama. (Submitted on September 14, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Tuskegee Airmen. (Submitted on September 14, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. The Tuskegee Airmen. "...The Red Tails were always out there where we wanted them to be ... We had no idea they were Black; it was the Army's best kept secret." (Submitted on September 18, 2008.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Air Force Report Contradicts the Legend
Since this marker was placed, records have come to light refuting the 332nd Fighter Group's standing as the only group never to have lost a bomber to enemy fighters. The Tuskegee Airmen's record was in fact comparable to the typical, all-White USAAF fighter groups with a number of bombers under their protection having been lost to enemy fighter aircraft.
    — Submitted September 14, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.

 
Additional keywords. 332nd
The Tuskegee Airmen of World War II Marker and Sugar Maple Memorial Tree image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 16, 2011
3. The Tuskegee Airmen of World War II Marker and Sugar Maple Memorial Tree
Fighter Group, 99th Fighter Squadron, 477th Composite Group, The Redtails, USAAF, first Black fighter pilots.

 
Categories. African AmericansAir & SpaceCemeteries & Burial SitesHeroesMilitaryWar, World II
 
The Tuskegee Airmen of World War II Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, July 16, 2011
4. The Tuskegee Airmen of World War II Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 14, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 912 times since then and 25 times this year. Last updated on November 25, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 14, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3, 4. submitted on January 5, 2013, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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