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Clemson in Pickens County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

John C. Calhoun Memorial Highway

 
 
John C. Calhoun Memorial Highway Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
1. John C. Calhoun Memorial Highway Marker
Inscription.
Named in honor of John Caldwell Calhoun, (1782-1850), the Old South's most admired statesman and profound philosopher and America's most influential spokesman for state's rights.

From 1808 to 1810 he served his state as a member of the S.C. House of Representatives. Between 1811 and 1850 he served in the federal government as congressman, as secretary of war, twice as vice-president, as secretary of state, and as senator.

Calhoun was a brilliant parliamentarian, an able administrator, and a patriotic American. In 1957, the U.S. Senate voted Calhoun one of America's five "outstanding" senators of the past. (The others were Henry Clay, Daniel Webster, Robert M. LaFollette, and Robert B. Taft.)

Calhoun's home "Fort Hill" is located on nearby Clemson University Campus, Pickens County. He is interred in St. Philip's Churchyard, Charleston, S.C.
 
Location. 34° 41.167′ N, 82° 47.733′ W. Marker is in Clemson, South Carolina, in Pickens County. Marker is on Calhoun Memorial Highway, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located on SC Highway 123, east of the Berkeley Drive overpass. Marker is in this post office area: Clemson SC 29631, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured
John C. Calhoun Memorial Highway Looking East image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, November 28, 2008
2. John C. Calhoun Memorial Highway Looking East
as the crow flies. Blue Key National Honor Fraternity Gateway (approx. 1.3 miles away); Hanover House (approx. 1.5 miles away); a different marker also named Hanover House (approx. 1.5 miles away); a different marker also named Hanover House (approx. 1.5 miles away); The Hayden Conference Center (approx. 1.6 miles away); Dr. Luther W. Baxter (approx. 1.6 miles away); Log House (approx. 1.6 miles away); Hunt Cabin (approx. 1.6 miles away); The Camellia Garden (approx. 1.6 miles away); Hosta Garden Donors (approx. 1.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Clemson.
 
Also see . . .
1. John C. Calhoun. John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. (Submitted on December 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. John C. Calhoun by Holley Ulbrich. John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782-March 31, 1850) was a United States representative, senator, secretary of war, secretary of state, and vice president. (Submitted on December 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Vice Presidents of the United States: John C. Calhoun (pdf). (Submitted on December 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
4. "Slavery a Positive Good" a Speech Delivered by John C. Calhoun, February 6, 1837
John C. Calhoun image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
3. John C. Calhoun
. (Submitted on December 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
5. "The Clay Compromises", a Speech by John C. Calhoun, March 4, 1850. Calhoun's final speech, he was too ill to deliver it. It was read on the floow of the Senate, with him present, by another senator. By March 31, Calhoun was dead. (Submitted on December 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. USS John C. Calhoun (SSBN 630) Veterans Association. The ship, USS John C. Calhoun (SSBN 630), was a Fleet Ballistic Missile nuclear submarine, whose sole purpose was to be part of this nations "triad" of nuclear deterrence. (Submitted on December 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. John C. Calhoun (March. 17, 1782-March 31, 1850). "Free trade; low duties, no debt; separation from banks; economy; retrenchment, and strict adherence to the Constitution," read the campaign slogan of the Honorable John C. Calhoun during his last major bid for the presidency of the United States in 1843. (Submitted on December 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. John Caldwell Calhoun (1782 - 1850)
John Caldwell Calhoun, (cousin of John Ewing Colhoun and Joseph Calhoun), a Representative and a Senator from South Carolina and a Vice President of the United States; born near Calhoun Mills, Abbeville District (now Mount Carmel, McCormick County), S.C., March 18, 1782; attended the common schools and private academies; graduated from Yale College in 1804; studied law, admitted to the bar in 1807, and commenced practice in Abbeville, S.C.; also engaged in agricultural pursuits; member, State house of representatives 1808-1809; elected as a Democratic Republican to the Twelfth and to the three succeeding Congresses and served from March 4, 1811, to November 3, 1817, when he resigned; Secretary of War in the Cabinet of President James Monroe 1817-1825; elected vice president of the United States in 1824 with President John Quincy Adams; reelected in 1828 with President Andrew Jackson and served from March 4, 1825, to December 28, 1832, when he resigned, having been elected as a Democratic Republican (later Nullifier) to the United States Senate on December 12, 1832, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Robert Y. Hayne; reelected in 1834 and 1840 and served from December 29, 1832, until his resignation, effective March 3, 1843; Secretary of State in the Cabinet of President John Tyler 1844-1845; again elected to the United States Senate, as a Democrat, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Daniel E. Huger; reelected in 1846 and served from November 26, 1845, until his death in Washington, D.C., March 31, 1850; chairman, Committee on Finance (Twenty-ninth Congress); interment in St. Philip’s Churchyard, Charleston, S.C. (Source: Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress.)
    — Submitted December 27, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Antebellum South, USGovernmentNotable PersonsPolitics
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 3, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 884 times since then and 68 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 3, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on December 4, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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