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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pickens in Pickens County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Murphree-Hollingsworth Cabin

 
 
The Murphree-Hollingsworth Cabin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
1. The Murphree-Hollingsworth Cabin Marker
Inscription.
Ongoing development at this mill site includes a variety of ventures. Significant among these is the recent relocation and restoration of this Cabin. In the late 1780's the Secona Baptist Church was organized in Pickens. Named after the Cherokee town of "Soconey" along the twelve mile River, the church was one of the first in this area. The first pastor of the church was the Reverend William Murphree, who relocated to this area to serve the church. This cabin, circa 1791, was one of the earliest in this area of the upcountry and was constructed to serve as his home.

Over the years, various families lived in this solid two-story structure. When the church and pastor's home were rebuilt at a new location in the 1850's, this old cabin was possibly vacant and the property was eventually purchased by Columbus Lafayette Hollingsworth, who was moving his family from Old Pickens during the 1868 relocation of the town of Pickens. Hollingsworth and his family lived in the cabin while they built "Twelve Mile", the Hollingsworth home that burned in 1965. The property remains in the family to this day.

James and Dorothy Pence were living in Virginia at the time of the "Twelve Mile" fire, but came home to Pickens and for a period afterwards, making the old Cabin their base of operations while
The Murphree-Hollingsworth Cabin image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 29, 2009
2. The Murphree-Hollingsworth Cabin
they helped Dorothy's mother sort through the ashes. Dorothy, a great granddaughter of Columbus Hollingsworth, and her husband James, have been long time supporters for the preservation of our regional heritage. Dorothy's father, Jack Folger, was instrumental in the early 1970's saving and preserving of the historic Hagood Mill.

Therefore, it was no surprise that the Pence family wished to assist in the continued development of the mill site, and have made great contributions to this endeavor. Their donation to the Pickens County Museums of this beautiful two-story cabin now relocated to the Hagood Mill site was a tremendous step in the continuance of site development. With the reconstruction and restoration now completed through the work and talents of Ralph Perry and his family along with David Childress and the Pickens County Department of Buildings Maintenance, the staff and volunteers will now be able to concentrate on furnishing the cabin so that visitors might be able to experience a well preserved presentation reflecting life in "early" Pickens County as part of any tour of the Hagood Mill.
 
Location. 34° 55.583′ N, 82° 43.3′ W. Marker is in Pickens, South Carolina, in Pickens County. Marker can be reached from Hagood Mill Road. Touch for map. Marker is located near to right of the south entrance of the cabin. Marker is at or near this postal address: 138 Hagood Mill Road, Pickens SC 29671, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Hagood Cabin (within shouting distance of this marker); Hagood Mill Historic Site (within shouting distance of this marker); Soapstone Boulder (within shouting distance of this marker); Moorefield Memorial Highway (within shouting distance of this marker); Pickens (approx. 3 miles away); William M. Hagood (approx. 3 miles away); Hagood-Mauldin House (approx. 3 miles away); a different marker also named The Hagood-Mauldin House (approx. 3 miles away); Andrew Pickens (approx. 3 miles away); Elihu Griffin (approx. 3.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pickens.
 
Also see . . .
1. Secona Baptist Church. A brief history of Secona Baptist Church. (Submitted on June 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Hagood Mill. Hagood Mill is a good example of the simple, functional building style employed by South Carolina upcountry pioneers in the first half of the nineteenth century. (Submitted on June 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Secona Baptist Church. Official website of Secona Baptist Church. (Submitted on June 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Notable BuildingsSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 773 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 21, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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