Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greenville in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

“Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?”

 
 
"Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, June 14, 2009
1. "Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?" Marker
Inscription.
Soft drinks, candy and snacks were once sold here. The building's original 1935 plans (see exhibit inside) included a concession area at the main desk. However, after the annex (where restrooms are now) was added in 1945, the park manager's family and, later, the South Carolina Commission of the Blind ran a concessions stand there.

Lifeguards had a first aid station here and "there was a jukebox at the main door to the bathhouse on the porch." With hits like Shake, Rattle and Roll and Honey Love, "the first people I ever saw (dancing the) shag were at Paris Mountain State Park." (quotes from Cleveland Jourdan)
 
Location. 34° 55.617′ N, 82° 22.2′ W. Marker is in Greenville, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker can be reached from State Park Road. Touch for map. Marker is on the grounds of Paris Mountain State Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2401 State Park Road, Greenville SC 29609, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Come On In, the Water's Fine! (within shouting distance of this marker); New Life for Old Bathhouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to Paris Mountain State Park (about 300
"Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, June 14, 2009
2. "Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?" Marker
feet away, measured in a direct line); Open to the Sky (about 400 feet away); What's So Special About this Bridge? (about 700 feet away); The Dam for Reservoir 2 (approx. mile away); Barracks in the Woods (approx. mile away); Sulphur Spring (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Original Water Filter (approx. 0.9 miles away); Bull's Eye! (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greenville.
 
More about this marker. It is the 3rd marker in the park's Wayside Marker's Trail.
 
Also see . . .
1. Paris Mountain State Park. A renovated historic bathhouse serves as the new hub of activities at popular Paris Mountain State Park. (Submitted on June 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Paris Mountain State Park. Paris Mountain State Park is a park located north of Greenville, South Carolina. (Submitted on June 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Paris Mountain State Park Historic District. Paris Mountain is significant for its association
"Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, June 14, 2009
3. "Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?" Marker
with the establishment and development of a system of state parks in South Carolina. (Submitted on June 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Bathhouse Complex - Paris Mountain State Park Historic District National Register Nomination Form
The bathhouse complex is adjacent to the main park road and is located on a steep hillside above Lake Placid. It consists of the bathhouse, the swimming area, and extensive landscaping.

The dominate feature of the complex is the bathhouse itself (PM-25). Constructed by the CCC in 1936, it is rectangular in plan and one story in height with its front elevation facing the lake. It is a frame building sheathed in rough rubber masonry, with a solid concrete foundation. The roof is a lateral gable type with a shed roof extension that covers an open porch running the full length of the front elevation. The porch roof is supported by large rough cut native stone pillars. Originally, the porch included a low rustic wooden rail, however, this was replaced with a low stone wall sometime around 1943. Roofing material was originally wooden shingles, but is now composition shingles. The gable ends are enclosed and covered with painted wood shingles. A stone drinking fountain,
"Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, June 14, 2009
4. "Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?" Marker
This porch was an unofficial social center. "This was where we hung out, because it was good, clean fun." (quote from Virginia Shirley).
identical to the one [at] Shelter #1 complex, is also located on the porch, and forms part of the stone wall.

The main alteration to the bathhouse occurred in 1945 when a square rubble stone addition was added on the west side and connected to the main structure by a breezeway. This addition, which was used as a concession building, also incorporates a lateral gable roof, with gable ends covered in wood shingles. The architectural style and construction of the concessions addition is identical to the original core structure.

The bathhouse and swimming area are surrounded by extensive landscaping that includes an intricate network of paths, steps, drains, and low stone walls. The original landscaping done by the CCC was completed by 1940, and was later expanded by park management between 1943 and 1948. Original features include the french gully drains, a stone drinking fountain located on the hillside above the bathhouse, and a rhododendron lined path located to the east of the bathhouse. A brick path encircles the bathhouse and appears to be part of the original CCC landscape work. Two paths once extended downhill to the swimming area, however, these were replaced in 1943 with an elaborate system of rustic stone steps and low stone walls. Finally, in 1948, paved walkways were added that connect the bathhouse to the main park road.
"Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, June 14, 2009
5. "Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?" Marker
Originally only footpaths connected the bathhouse to the swimming area, as visible in this 1940s photograph. The stone steps were added in 1944, more directly connecting the porch with the swimming area.
    — Submitted November 23, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
"Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?" Marker<br>Park Center (former Bathhouse) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, June 14, 2009
6. "Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?" Marker
Park Center (former Bathhouse)
The view of the lake from the Park Center image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 20, 2009
7. The view of the lake from the Park Center
The Front of the Park Center image. Click for full size.
By Stanley and Terrie Howard, May 20, 2009
8. The Front of the Park Center
Park Center (former Bathhouse)<br>Rear Facade with Walking Path image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, June 14, 2009
9. Park Center (former Bathhouse)
Rear Facade with Walking Path
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,314 times since then and 116 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on June 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on October 19, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   6. submitted on June 23, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7, 8. submitted on June 23, 2009, by Stanley and Terrie Howard of Greer, South Carolina.   9. submitted on November 23, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
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