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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fairmont in Marion County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

High-Level / Million Dollar Robert H. Mollohan Bridge

 
 
High-Level / Million Dollar Robert H. Mollohan Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
1. High-Level / Million Dollar Robert H. Mollohan Bridge Marker
Inscription. Completed in 1921, honoring WWI veterans. Designed by Concrete Steel Engineering Co., NY; built by John F. Casey Co., Pittsburgh. Three 250 ft. reinforced concrete arch spans, 90 ft. above river, 1,266 ft. long. Connected Fairmont by trolley, foot and vehicle. Listed on National Register, 1991, renamed in honor of Congressman Mollohan’s public service, and restored in 2000.
 
Erected 2004 by Main Street Fairmont and the West Virginia Division of Archives and History.
 
Location. 39° 29.042′ N, 80° 8.535′ W. Marker is in Fairmont, West Virginia, in Marion County. Marker is at the intersection of Jefferson Street and Washington Street, on the right when traveling east on Jefferson Street. Touch for map. Marker at the sidewalk, flat against the stone retaining wall for the A. Brooks Fleming House site. Marker is in this post office area: Fairmont WV 26554, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A. Brooks Fleming House (here, next to this marker); Fairmont (about 400
High-Level / Million Dollar Robert H. Mollohan Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
2. High-Level / Million Dollar Robert H. Mollohan Bridge Marker
This is the WPA-built retaining wall for the A. Brooks Fleming House. Jefferson Street is in the foreground ramping down to the bridge which is out of frame to the left. The A. Brooks Fleming House marker is above this marker, hidden by the wooden fence.
feet away, measured in a direct line); Marion County Courthouse (about 400 feet away); Boaz Fleming (about 400 feet away); Attack on Fairmont (about 600 feet away); Francis H. Pierpont Home (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Colonel George S. “Spanky” Roberts, USAF Memorial Bridge (approx. ¼ mile away); Battle for the Bridge (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fairmont.
 
More about this marker. There are two copies of this marker, one on each end of the bridge. This is the western historical marker. Look at the page for the eastern historical marker for more photographs and bridge construction information.
 
Regarding High-Level / Million Dollar Robert H. Mollohan Bridge. The 1921 bridge carried the tracks of the Monongahela Valley Traction Company, an electric railway that ran the streetcar
View East Away from Downtown image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
3. View East Away from Downtown
lines in Fairmont on both sides of the river and also provided interurban passenger service between Fairmont and Mannington and between Fairmont, and Weston via Clarksburg. The lampposts on the bridge were originally designed to also hold up the trolley wire that powered the streetcars.
 
Also see . . .  Monongahela West Penn Public Service Company. Excerpt from the 2000 book The Electric Interurban Railways in America by George W. Hilton and John Due.

“By far the most important West Virginia interurban was this large enterprise centered in the mountainous Clarksburg-Fairmont area. The Fairmont and Clarksburg Electric Railroad Company was begun to connect the two cities (25 miles) in 1901 and reported completed in 1907. The successor Monongahela Valley Traction Company extended the main line 24 miles from Clarksburg south to Weston in 1913. Branches from Fairmont to Mannington and Fairview were built in 1910 and 1911, respectively, and the company built a large number of short branches or spurs to mines and mining communities along the main line. The company provided street railway service in both Fairmont and Clarksburg. The main line was heavily graded and capable of handling railroad equipment; the company developed a small interchange of coal in hopper cars with the railroads.

“The Monongahela Valley Traction Company changed its name in 1921 to the Monongahela
Monongahela River Bridge image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
4. Monongahela River Bridge
Flagpoles at western pier. Notice the lampposts. These are replicas of the originals, which were also used to suspend the trolley wires for the Monongahela Valley Traction Company's streetcars that crossed the bridge.
Power and Railway Company, and in 1923 to the Monongahela West Penn Public Service Company, indicating the growth in importance of the auxiliary power business. Monongahela West Penn was part of the extensive network of public utility properties of the American Water Works and Electric System, along with the West Penn Railways.” (Submitted on August 1, 2009.) 
 
Categories. Bridges & Viaducts
 
Lightposts on Million Dollar Bridge image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
5. Lightposts on Million Dollar Bridge
Interurban Company Plaque on Base of Flagpole image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
6. Interurban Company Plaque on Base of Flagpole
“During the construction of the Monongahela River Bridge the Marion County Court 1918 — S. L. Shaver, President; Richard V. Millan, Commissioner; Calvin D. Conaway, Commissioner; Walter R. Haggerty, Prosecuting Attorney; A.G. Martin, County Clerk. 1921 — Calvin D. Conaway, President; Richard V. Millan, Commissioner; Amos O. Stanley, Commissioner; Frank R. Amos, Prosecuting Attorney; Lee N. Satterfield, County Clerk and the Monongahela Valley Traction Co. George M. Alexander, President, Fairmont, W. Va. cooperated with the administrations of the City of Fairmont, W. Va.”
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 1, 2009, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,016 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 1, 2009, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
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