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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
West Point in Orange County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Wars That Shaped the Nation

The Revolutionary War

 
 
Replacement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 6, 2014
1. Replacement Marker
The text on the new marker varies just slightly from that of the original marker.
Inscription.
In 1775, American minutemen at Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts, fired the “shots heard around the world.” The colonists fought the British to establish their independence from New York to Georgia and from Massachusetts Bay to the Indian territories beyond the Appalachian Mountains. From 1776 to 1778, fighting centered near New York and Philadelphia. In 1780, the British focused on a campaign in the South. Unsuccessful and pursued by Generals Nathaniel Greene and George Washington, the British retreated to Yorktown, Virginia. In 1781, under the tightening siege of French and American forces, the British, under Lord Cornwallis, surrendered. The Continental Army moved to nearby New Windsor, New York, until the British recognized American independence with the Treaty of Paris in 1783.

West Point’s role in the American Revolution was critical. At the time of the Revolution, the Hudson River was a major transportation route in the colonies. The bend in the river here was the only major obstacle that a ship had to negotiate between New York City and Albany. The Americans recognized this at the outset of the war and began the first of a number of plans to fortify the ground on both sides of the river and construct a chain obstacle from West Point to Constitution Island. The British raided the island in 1777 as part
Wars That Shaped the Nation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 5, 2009
2. Wars That Shaped the Nation Marker
of a campaign to take the entire river. In 1778, the Americans shifted to the higher ground at West Point and its surrounding hills, building a fortress the British never challenged.

The weapons of the Revolution show the state of the gunmaker’s art at the end of the eighteenth century. All the guns were imported from Europe because America had no cannon foundries at the beginning of the war. Made of bronze, the guns ornate detailing characterizes the artistic nature of cannon casting in France and England. These smoothbore muzzle loaders could fire solid shot weighing 6 to 12 pounds. The shorter weapon on the carriage is a howitzer captured at Saratoga, that was designed to deliver plunging fire from a high angle onto entrenched troops.
 
Location. 41° 23.734′ N, 73° 57.34′ W. Marker is in West Point, New York, in Orange County. Marker is on Cullum Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located at Trophy Point in the U.S. Military Academy. Marker is in this post office area: West Point NY 10996, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Wars That Shaped the Nation (a few steps from this marker); Our National Heritage (within shouting distance of this marker); The Great Chain
New Revolutionary War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 6, 2014
3. New Revolutionary War Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); In Memoriam (within shouting distance of this marker); Sherburne’s Redoubt (within shouting distance of this marker); Constitution Island (within shouting distance of this marker); West Point in the American Revolution (within shouting distance of this marker); West Point Benches (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in West Point.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Tour the “Wars that shaped the Nation” markers found at Trophy Point at the U.S. Military Academy
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
New Marker at Trophy Point image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 6, 2014
4. New Marker at Trophy Point
The replacement marker is pictured near the Great Chain that spanned the Hudson River during the Revolutionary War.
Marker at Trophy Point image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 5, 2009
5. Marker at Trophy Point
An English Howitzer and a section of the Great Chain can be seen in this photo next to the marker.
Revolutionary War Howitzer image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 5, 2009
6. Revolutionary War Howitzer
This 8-inch English Howitzer, located near the marker, was captured at the Battle of Saratoga, October 7, 1777.
American Artillery Cannon image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 5, 2009
7. American Artillery Cannon
This French 6-pounder cannon, located next to the marker, was cast in 1761 and used by the American Artillery during the Revolutionary War.
Detail on Cannon Barrel image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, September 5, 2009
8. Detail on Cannon Barrel
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 7, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,492 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 12, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on September 7, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4. submitted on July 12, 2014, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on September 7, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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