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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Seattle in King County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

Pioneer Building

 

—1989 Washington State Centennial —

 
Pioneer Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 13, 2009
1. Pioneer Building Marker
Inscription.
The Pioneer Building is one of the finest and most ornate buildings in the District, characteristic of the Richardsonian Romanesque style prevalent throughout Pioneer Square. Constructed in 1889 on the site of Henry Yesler’s first home. This building is the most authentic existing example of the work of architect Elmer Fisher. The heavy rough stone arch at the building entrance is a distinctive trademark of Fisher’s work in the square. Fisher designed over fifty other buildings in the two years following the Great Fire of 1889.

[Seal of the City of Seattle, 1869]
 
Erected 1989 by Historic Seattle, Museum of History and Industry, Pioneer Square Businesses, and King County.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 47° 36.125′ N, 122° 20.023′ W. Marker is in Seattle, Washington, in King County. Marker can be reached from 1st Avenue north of James Street and Yesler Way. Touch for map. Marker is at the main (west) entrance of the Pioneer Building which is at the eastern edge of the Pioneer Square Park, between 1st and 2nd Avenues, north of the James Street/Yester Way merge. The park contains the historic totem poll and
Pioneer Building seen from 1st Avenue across Pioneer Square Park image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, September 13, 2009
2. Pioneer Building seen from 1st Avenue across Pioneer Square Park
With historic totem pole (relocated from British Columbia) at center, left.
pergola which are also part of the National Historic Landmark. Marker is at or near this postal address: 600 1st Avenue, Seattle WA 98104, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Pioneer Square Pergola (within shouting distance of this marker); Mutual Life Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Merchant’s Cafe (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Yesler's Pavillion (within shouting distance of this marker); Interurban Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Schwabacher’s Store (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Interurban Building (about 400 feet away); Maynard Building (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Seattle.
 
Regarding Pioneer Building. This site was designated as a National Historical Landmark on May 5, 1977.
Statement of Significance:
"The Pioneer Building, completed in 1892 and built on the site of the home of one of the city's founding father's, is Richardsonian Romanesque in style. It is one of the best preserved buildings in Pioneer Square, the heart of the commercial district of old Seattle. The Pergola remnant is in the center of the square and is a beautiful cast iron umbrella that was once a much
Pioneer Building - 1900 image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
3. Pioneer Building - 1900
larger shelter for transit passengers."
 
Also see . . .
1. Henry Yesler. (Submitted on September 16, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Seattle's Great Fire. (Submitted on September 17, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. NPS: Pioneer Square - Skid Road Historic District. (Submitted on September 17, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceLandmarksNotable BuildingsSettlements & Settlers
 
Intersection of 1st Avenue, James Street and Yesler Way (orignally, "Skid Road") - 1917 image. Click for full size.
4. Intersection of 1st Avenue, James Street and Yesler Way (orignally, "Skid Road") - 1917
The Pioneer Building and Pioneer Square Park (with its historic pergola along the sidewalk), left; Seattle Hotel and the Smith Tower, right.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 16, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,085 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 16, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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