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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lutherville in Baltimore County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Lutherville Historic District

 
 
Lutherville Historic District Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Pfingsten, September 3, 2007
1. Lutherville Historic District Marker
Inscription. National Register of Historic Places, U.S. Department of the Interior, 1972.

Lutherville, named for Martin Luther, was founded, 1852, by Dr. John G. Morris, a Lutheran clergyman, as the location of Lutherville Female Seminary. The planned village, centering around the Lutheran Church and Seminary, was surveyed into 118 lots by William sides, 1854. “Oak Grove,” 1852, the home of Dr. Morris, one tenth mile east, is a notable example of 19th century architecture.
 
Erected by Maryland Historical Society.
 
Location. 39° 25.439′ N, 76° 37.746′ W. Marker is in Lutherville, Maryland, in Baltimore County. Marker is at the intersection of Front Street and Morris Street, on the right when traveling south on Front Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lutherville Timonium MD 21093, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hunt’s Church (approx. 1.7 miles away); Jones Falls Watershed (approx. 1.7 miles away); Baltimore and Susquehanna Railroad Marble Track Bed (approx. 1.8 miles away); Vietnam Veterans Memorial
Lutherville Train Station image. Click for full size.
By William Pfingsten, September 3, 2007
2. Lutherville Train Station
In the late 1960s Pennsylvania Railroad passenger train service at Lutherville ended. In 1854 it was the Northern Central Railway that provided service to Lutherville. Today Lutherville is again served by rail, Baltimore's MTA Light Rail line.
(approx. 2 miles away); Baltimore County Courthouse (approx. 2.1 miles away); Hampton (approx. 2.1 miles away); Abisado (approx. 2.1 miles away); a different marker also named Baltimore County Courthouse (approx. 2.1 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Lutherville Female Academy. A view of the Lutherville Female Seminary built in 1854 by Dixon, Balbirnie & Dixon under the aegis of Dr. John Morris, the founder of Lutherville. This photo shows a front view of the original central cupola and adjacent chimneys. (Submitted on September 14, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 

2. Home of Dr. John Morris, c. 1910 - 1912. The garden façade of Oak Grove at 313 Morris Avenue in Lutherville is seen in the summer. It was the home of Dr. John Morris, the founder of Lutherville. (Submitted on September 14, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 

3. The Marker, c. 1976. (Submitted on September 14, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.)
4. A photograph of the Lutherville Station, c. 1930. (Submitted on September 14, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.)
5. John Gottlieb Morris. Dr. John Gottlieb Morris (1803–1895,) the founder of Lutherville is with his daughter, Georgiana Morris Leisenring (1838–1918)(on right), his grand-daughter Louise Reisenring Reese (1864–1943)
Home in Lutherville Historic District image. Click for full size.
By William Pfingsten, September 3, 2007
3. Home in Lutherville Historic District
This may be the home of Dr. Morris
and his great grand-daughter Louise Morris Reese (1888–1973). (Submitted on September 14, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.EducationNotable PersonsPolitical Subdivisions
 
Home in Lutherville Historic District image. Click for full size.
By William Pfingsten, September 3, 2007
4. Home in Lutherville Historic District
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 4, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 3, 2007, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. This page has been viewed 3,374 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 3, 2007, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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