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Near Sparta in Hancock County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Nathan S.S. Beman at Mt. Zion

(Nov. 26, 1785 - Aug. 6, 1871)

 
 
Nathan S.S. Beman at Mt. Zion Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, October 28, 2009
1. Nathan S.S. Beman at Mt. Zion Marker
Inscription. Nathan Sidney Beman, Presbyterian minister, educator, editor, college president, after graduating from Middlebury College, Vermont, taught and preached in New England until 1812, when he came with his wife to Georgia to regain his health. “A man of intelligence and almost boundless energy,” Nathan Beman found unusual opportunities in Georgia where wealthy planters were banding together to establish centers of religious instruction and education for their children.

In late 1812, Beman became teacher and pastor at Mt. Zion, an academy town founded by Hancock County planters in 1811. Some of the State’s leading families supported Mt. Zion Academy which became one of the most celebrated schools in Georgia. The outstanding men Beman attracted to teach contributed much to the state in educational and religious leadership.

Offered the presidency of the University of Georgia, Beman accepted reluctantly and temporarily, resigning because of his wife’s illness and death in 1819. He continued to direct the Academy, to preach, and to edit The Missionary, a weekly gospel newspaper. In 1821 he married Mrs. Caroline Bird Yancey, mother of secessionist William Lowndes Yancey. In 1823, Nathan Beman and his wife moved to Troy, N.Y., where he continued his ministerial and academic career.
 
Erected
Nathan S.S. Beman at Mt. Zion Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, October 28, 2009
2. Nathan S.S. Beman at Mt. Zion Marker
Mt. Zion church is in the background
1966 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 070-12.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 33° 21.467′ N, 83° 0.161′ W. Marker is near Sparta, Georgia, in Hancock County. Marker is at the intersection of Georgia Route 15 and Sigman Road, on the right when traveling south on State Route 15. Touch for map. The marker is at Mt. Zion church, a building begun in 1813. This building is all that remains of the community of Mt. Zion. Marker is in this post office area: Sparta GA 31087, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Gov. William Jonathan Northen (approx. 0.4 miles away); “July” 1858 (approx. 4.2 miles away); Shoulder-bone Creek Treaty (approx. 4.7 miles away); Camilla and Zack Hubert Homesite (approx. 5.1 miles away); Gov. William Rabun (approx. 5.3 miles away); "Old Dominion" (approx. 5.6 miles away); Famous Indian Trail (approx. 5.7 miles away); Sparta Cemetery (approx. 5.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sparta.
 
Also see . . .  Nathan S. S. Beman. (Submitted on November 6, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.)
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USChurches, Etc.EducationNotable Persons
 
Nathan S.S. Beman at Mt. Zion Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 2, 2012
3. Nathan S.S. Beman at Mt. Zion Marker
The marker has now been slightly relocated, further from the highway.
Mt. Zion Church image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 4, 2007
4. Mt. Zion Church
The Mt. Zion Presbyterian Church was begun in 1813. The church declined in membership following the Civil War, and was transferred to the Methodists, who held services until 1958. It is the only remaining building of the Mt. Zion community.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 4, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 759 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 4, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   3. submitted on August 12, 2012, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   4. submitted on November 4, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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