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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Round Rock in Williamson County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Round Rock

 
 
The Round Rock Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson
1. The Round Rock Marker
Inscription. A guide for Indians and early settlers, this table-shaped stone in the middle of Brushy Creek once marked an important low-water wagon crossing. Hundered-year-old wheel ruts are still visible in the creek bottom. The rocky stream bed also provided building stone for pioneer homes. “Brushy Creek” post office was established in 1851 to serve the settlement that grew up near this natural ford. At the urging of postmaster Thomas C. Oatts, it was renamed “Round Rock” in 1854. This name was retained when the town relocated along the railroad (1 mi. E) in 1877.
 
Erected 1975 by the Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 9330.)
 
Location. 30° 30.785′ N, 97° 41.368′ W. Marker is in Round Rock, Texas, in Williamson County. Marker is on Chisholm Trail Road (County Road 173). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Round Rock TX 78664, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. William M. Owen House Complex (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Barker House (approx. 0.3 miles away); Education in Round Rock (approx. half a mile away); Round Rock Cemetery
The Round Rock Marker (facing east) image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, October 6, 2013
2. The Round Rock Marker (facing east)
(approx. half a mile away); Slave Burial Ground in Old Round Rock Cemetery (approx. half a mile away); The Pioneer Builders (approx. half a mile away); Sam Bass' Death Site (approx. 0.7 miles away); Old Broom Factory Building (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Round Rock.
 
Categories. Landmarks
 
The Round Rock Marker (facing northwest) image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, October 6, 2013
3. The Round Rock Marker (facing northwest)
The Round Rock image. Click for full size.
By Sharon N. Goodman, February 16, 2013
4. The Round Rock
The water in Brushy Creek is extremely low and most of the Round Rock is now showing. You can walk out to it on the left side without getting your feet wet. The Round Rock Marker is located on the bridge in the background.The ruts from the Chisholm Trail are to the right of the Round Rock in this photo, although not visible in photo.
Close-up of The Round Rock looking West. image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, October 6, 2013
5. Close-up of The Round Rock looking West.
Close-up of the Round Rock with low water. image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, October 6, 2013
6. Close-up of the Round Rock with low water.
Notice the coloration on the rock. Rival football teams in the area have a habit of painting the rock with school colors.
Another close-up of the Round Rock with low water. image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, October 6, 2013
7. Another close-up of the Round Rock with low water.
Wagon ruts with low water. image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, October 6, 2013
8. Wagon ruts with low water.
Wagon Wheel Ruts image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson
9. Wagon Wheel Ruts
Wide-area view of the Round Rock looking West. image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, October 6, 2013
10. Wide-area view of the Round Rock looking West.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 27, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 28, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. This page has been viewed 1,251 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 28, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.   2, 3. submitted on October 6, 2013, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.   4. submitted on February 20, 2013, by Sharon N. Goodman of Round Rock, Texas.   5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on October 6, 2013, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.   9. submitted on November 28, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.   10. submitted on October 6, 2013, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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