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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Vincennes in Knox County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Vincennes in the American Revolution

 
 
Vincennes in the American Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Light, August 28, 2007
1. Vincennes in the American Revolution Marker
Inscription. After taking Kaskaskia on July 5, 1778, George Roges Clark, Acting under Virginia authority, sent Father Pierre Gibault, as his envoy, to Vincennes. Gibault convinced the villagers there to take an oath of loyalty to the Americans. In early August, Captain Leonard Helm arrived to take command of Fort Sackville. On December 17, British Forces under Colonel Henry Hamilton recaptured the Fort. Clark with some 160 men reached Vincennes on February 23, 1779, after an eighteen-day March through flooded country. The move caught Hamilton by surprise. Two days later he surrendered. The Fort, Renamed Patrick Henry, remained in American hands.
 
Erected 1976 by Illinois Bicentennial Commission, the Illinois State Historical Society and the Indiana Historical Society.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Illinois State Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 38° 40.796′ N, 87° 31.977′ W. Marker is in Vincennes, Indiana, in Knox County. Marker is at the intersection of Ste Honore Plaza and North 1st Street on Ste Honore Plaza. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Vincennes IN 47591, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Old Cathedral “French and Indian” Cemetery
Ste. Honore Plaza image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Light, August 28, 2007
2. Ste. Honore Plaza
(within shouting distance of this marker); U.S.S. Vincennes (within shouting distance of this marker); Gold Star - - Honor Roll (within shouting distance of this marker); Vincennes (within shouting distance of this marker); Patriotism of Charles Gratiot (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of House Occupied as Headquarters (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Ferry Landing (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Home of Francis Vigo (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Vincennes.
 
Also see . . .
1. George Rogers Clark National Memorial. George Rogers Clark National Memorial commemorates the site of the battle of Vincennes, and the western campaign of the American Revolution (Submitted on September 27, 2007, by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana.) 

2. Video Tour:: “Historic Vincennes” - and - George Rogers Clark National Monument. Courtesy of:: Public Television WILL-TV (Illinois) Eleanor Stasheff produced this historical
Diorama of Fort Sackville image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Light, August 28, 2007
3. Diorama of Fort Sackville
George Rogers Clark National Memorial is just across Vigo Street. Vigo Street crosses the Memorial Bridge. It was on the grounds of the Memorial that Fort Sackville originally was located.
review of Vincennes, Indiana. The French settled Vincennes in 1782 which was the Capital of the “Indiana Territory” the most important cities of the Midwest with a colorful history. (Submitted on January 9, 2009, by Al Wolf of Veedersburg, Indiana.) 
 
Categories. Notable EventsNotable PersonsPatriots & Patriotism
 
Clark Memorial Rotunda image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Light, August 28, 2007
4. Clark Memorial Rotunda
The grounds to the right were once Fort Sackville. The Rotunda would have been the southweast corner of the stockade.
Vincennes in the American Revolution Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 15, 2012
5. Vincennes in the American Revolution Marker
Wabash River Bridge in distance
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 17, 2007, by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana. This page has been viewed 4,845 times since then and 69 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 17, 2007, by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana.   5. submitted on December 13, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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