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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sumter in Sumter County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Temple Sinai

 
 
Temple Sinai Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
1. Temple Sinai Marker
Inscription. (Front text)
Sumterís Jewish community, dating to 1815, has long been one of the largest and most influential in inland S.C. Mark Solomons, Franklin J. Moses, and Montgomery Moses brought their families to Sumter District from the old and well-established Jewish community in Charleston. Other families, from Spain, Germany, Poland, Russia, and other European nations, followed. Two organizations founded shortly after the Civil War would later join to form a congregation.

(Reverse text)
The Hebrew Cemetery Society was founded in 1874, the Sumter Hebrew Benevolent Society was founded before 1881, and the two societies agreed to merge that year. A formal merger in 1895 created the Sumter Society of Israelites, the official name of Congregation Sinai. The first synagogue, a frame building constructed by 1900, burned. It was replaced in 1913 by this Moorish Revival brick synagogue, listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1999.
 
Erected 2009 by The Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina. (Marker Number 43-42.)
 
Location. 33° 55.305′ N, 80° 20.797′ W. Marker is in Sumter, South Carolina, in Sumter County. Marker is on Church Street near West Hampton Avenue, on
Temple Sinai Marker, reverse side image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 10, 2010
2. Temple Sinai Marker, reverse side
the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 11 Church Street, Sumter SC 29150, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Sumter District Confederate Dead (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sumterville Academy (about 600 feet away); Military Post / Potter's Raid (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Tuomey Hospital (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mount Pisgah African Methodist Episcopal Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Potter's Headquarters / Federal Order Of Battle (approx. 0.3 miles away); Sumter's Court Houses (approx. 0.3 miles away); Sumter Institute (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sumter.
 
Regarding Temple Sinai. Temple Sinai is a significant example of a sanctuary designed in the Moorish Revival style. It is also a visible symbol and tangible reminder of the substantial and influential Jewish community in Sumter from the early nineteenth century to the present. As the center of that community, its impact and influence were widespread. Outside the coastal cities of Charleston and Georgetown, where there were well-established and significant Jewish populations dating to colonial days, Sumterís Jewish community was one of inland South Carolinaís largest. Congregation
Temple Sinai and Marker seen along Church Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 10, 2010
3. Temple Sinai and Marker seen along Church Street
Sinai grew out of the formation of several societies in Sumter in the mid-nineteenth century. By 1895, the Sumter Hebrew Benevolent Society and the Sumter Society of Israelites merged under the name of the Sumter Society of Israelites. Between 1895 and 1904, the society purchased a lot on the corner of Church Street and West Hampton Avenue as the site for a synagogue. By 1906, the congregation had constructed a wood-frame building. The second, and present, brick sanctuary was built ca. 1910-17. Listed in the National Register January 21, 1999.
(South Carolina Department of Archives and History )
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
Temple Sinai image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 10, 2010
4. Temple Sinai
National register of Historical Places:
Temple Sinai (added 1999 - Building - #98001645)
Temple Sinai Marker image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History, circa 1999
5. Temple Sinai Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 14, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 978 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on February 14, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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