Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Burnet in Burnet County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Site of Town of Strickling

 
 
Site of Town of Strickling Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, December 30, 2007
1. Site of Town of Strickling Marker
Inscription. Once a busy rural community. Named for Mrs. Martha (Webster) Strickling, who settled here in 1853 with husband Marmaduke. As child, she survived killing of some 30 settlers in infamous Webster Massacre near Leander, and months of Indian captivity.

Post office opened here, 1857, and Strickling became a mail terminal and stage stop. Tons of lumber and buffalo hides were hauled through here. The town had a school, churches, a doctor’s office, and stores.

Strickling gradually declined when bypassed by the railroad, 1882. Only the cemetery remains.
 
Erected 1970 by the State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 9750.)
 
Location. 30° 50.654′ N, 98° 5.906′ W. Marker is near Burnet, Texas, in Burnet County. Marker is on FM-1174 just from CR-210A, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Burnet TX 78611, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Black's Fort (approx. 1.3 miles away); Shady Grove Community (approx. 2.1 miles away); Bethel Cemetery (approx. 4 miles away); Joppa Community (approx.
Site of Town of Strickling Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, December 30, 2007
2. Site of Town of Strickling Marker
4.2 miles away); Bertram (approx. 7.1 miles away); Lake Victor Lodge No. 1011, A. F. & A. M. (approx. 7.2 miles away); Bertram School (approx. 7.3 miles away); Mount Zion Cemetery (approx. 8.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Burnet.
 
Also see . . .
1. Handbook of Texas Online. Strickling, TX (Submitted on February 19, 2010, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.) 

2. Historical Marker, Webster Massacre. This is the marker associated with the Webster Massacre, at the mass grave in nearby Leander, Texas. (Submitted on November 18, 2011, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

3. Historical marker for Hornsby Bend. The Webster party mentioned on the marker originated at Hornsby Bend, east of Austin, TX (Submitted on November 19, 2011, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

4. A Guide to the Martha Virginia Webster Strickland Simmons Narrative, 1912. From the University of Texas Briscoe Center for American History, a first hand account of the Webster Massacre by Martha: "Comprised of a typed historical sketch, the Martha Virginia Webster Strickland Simmons Narrative, 1912, concerns Simmons’ life from 1835 to 1846 as a survivor of the Webster Massacre.." (Submitted on November 19, 2011, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.)
Site of Town of Strickling Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, July 24, 2015
3. Site of Town of Strickling Marker
View of marker looking in direction of cemetery, and towards the North San Gabriel River
 
 
Additional comments.
1.
What is not mentioned on the historical marker is that this general locale was the destination of the Webster party, i.e. the land grant John Webster (of Webster massacre on marker) received and was headed for. The land grant was inherited by Martha (Webster) Strickling as John Webster's sole heir. See Handbook of Texas Online. The Webster party had started at Hornsby Bend, east of Austin, TX, had reached this general area, then began a retreat after signs of Indians in the area were spotted. They made it as far as what is now Leander, Texas, where they were attacked.
    — Submitted November 18, 2011, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.

 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
Strickling Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, November 18, 2011
4. Strickling Cemetery
Nearby Strickling Cemetery mentioned on historical marker. See name on top of gate.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 19, 2010, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. This page has been viewed 843 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 19, 2010, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.   3. submitted on July 26, 2015, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   4. submitted on November 18, 2011, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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