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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Hibbing in St. Louis County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Hull-Rust-Mahoning Mine

 
 
Hull-Rust-Mahoning Mine Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, September 28, 2007
1. Hull-Rust-Mahoning Mine Marker
Inscription. It has been called the “Grand Canyon of the North”—a fitting title for the world’s largest open pit iron mine. The Hull-Rust-Mahoning pit actually began as separate mines, named for their owners, first dug in 1895, that gradually merged into one. Today this enormous pit measures 1.5 by 3.5 miles with a depth of 600 feet. Because of its size and the important developments that took place here, the Hull-Rust-Mahoning mine played a key role in making Minnesota the leading iron-ore producer in the country.

Setting in the midst of the Mesabi Range, the largest of Minnesota’s three iron ore ranges, this mine owed its dominance to its particular iron formations. Here, vast stretches of high-grade, soft ore lay in shallow deposits that could be scooped up with giant steam shovels, machinery perfected at this site. Using the open pit method, mining companies removed huge quantities of iron ore quickly and economically, dumping it into rail cars that were moved out of the mine on tracks circling the slopes of the pit.

Large mining operations required extensive financial resources. Small local developers were soon driven out, and the wealthy ones with names like Rockefeller and Carnegie took over. In 1901 J. P. Morgan consolidated their mining and manufacturing operations as United States Steel, creating
Hull-Rust-Mahoning Mine, Marker & Displays image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, September 28, 2007
2. Hull-Rust-Mahoning Mine, Marker & Displays
what was then the biggest corporation in the world.

The Hull-Rust-Mahoning Mine developed rapidly in the early 1900s, when demand was high for iron and steel to build railroads, bridges, and skyscrapers. In its peak production years during World War I and II, this pit supplied as much as one-fourth of all the iron ore mined in the United States. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966.
 
Erected 1999 by the Minnesota Historical Society.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Minnesota Historical Society, and the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 47° 26.861′ N, 92° 56.806′ W. Marker is near Hibbing, Minnesota, in St. Louis County. Marker can be reached from Greyhound Boulevard/3rd Avenue East, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is beyond the mine visitor center/observation building; accessible only when open. Marker is in this post office area: Hibbing MN 55746, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hill of Three Waters or the Triple Divide ( here, next to this marker); P & H 2300 Production Shovel Bucket ( a few steps from this marker); Marion 1150 Dragline Bucket ( a few steps from this marker);
Hull-Rust-Mahoning Mine image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, September 28, 2007
3. Hull-Rust-Mahoning Mine
Mining Haul Truck Engine Module ( within shouting distance of this marker); 170 & 240 Ton Production Trucks ( within shouting distance of this marker); Haulpak Production Truck Tires ( within shouting distance of this marker); Underground Mining in the Hibbing Area ( within shouting distance of this marker); Hull-Rust Mahoning Mine Pit Overlook ( within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hibbing.
 
Also see . . .  Hull Rust Mahoning Mine View. (Submitted on October 8, 2007, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceLandmarksNatural Resources
 
Hull-Rust-Mahoning Mine image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, September 28, 2007
4. Hull-Rust-Mahoning Mine
Entrance Road Sign image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, September 28, 2007
5. Entrance Road Sign
Welcome To Historic North Hibbing Minnesota Mine-View Observation Building

May 15 - Sept. 30 / Hours: 9 AM - 5 PM "The" HULL RUST - World's Largest Iron Ore/Taconite Open Pit Mine
Nearby Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, September 28, 2007
6. Nearby Plaque
Hull-Rust-Mahoning Open Pit Iron Mine has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935. This site possesses exceptional value in commemorating or illustrating the history of the United States. U. S. Department of the Interior - National Park Service - 1966
Winter at the mine view image. Click for full size.
By Joseph Baker, February 2, 2008
7. Winter at the mine view
Drilling Blast Holes image. Click for full size.
By Joseph Baker, February 2, 2008
8. Drilling Blast Holes
Bucyrus 59R, Drilling Blast Holes 1st week of 02/08 at Hibbing taconite.
240 Ton Haul Truck Making Its Way To The Crusher Or The Dump image. Click for full size.
By Joseph Baker, February 2, 2008
9. 240 Ton Haul Truck Making Its Way To The Crusher Or The Dump
Unknown if its load is for the crusher or the "dump" pile? These trucks are awesome in size, I have had the honor to ride in many of these trucks.......JMB SKF/USA
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 8, 2007, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 3,939 times since then and 88 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week October 21, 2007. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 8, 2007, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.   7, 8, 9. submitted on February 2, 2008, by Joseph Baker of Hibbing, Minnesota. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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