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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tuscaloosa in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Architect

 
 
The Architect Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, March 13, 2010
1. The Architect Marker
Inscription. The Capitol in Tuscaloosa was designed by English-born architect, William Nichols, who served as State Architect from 1826 - 1832. Nichols also designed and built the campus of The University of Alabama.
Before coming to Alabama he had remodeled the North Carolina Capitol and Governor's Palace in Raleigh. He also designed and built several structures at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
After leaving Alabama, Nichols served as assistant state engineer for Louisiana where he designed a temporary State House in New Orleans.
Later, as State Architect of Mississippi, Nichols designed the Mississippi Capitol and Governor's Mansion in Jackson. He also designed and built the University of Mississippi in Oxford.
 
Erected 1992 by City of Tuscaloosa.
 
Location. 33° 12.48′ N, 87° 34.446′ W. Marker is in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, in Tuscaloosa County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of 6th Street and 28th Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is located in Capitol Park on the east side of the Capitol Ruins. Marker is in this post office area: Tuscaloosa AL 35401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Tavern (within shouting distance of this marker); Alabama Central Female College
The Architect Marker on the east side of the Capitol Ruins. image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, March 13, 2010
2. The Architect Marker on the east side of the Capitol Ruins.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Masons Marks (within shouting distance of this marker); Clement Comer Clay (within shouting distance of this marker); Arthur P. Bagby (within shouting distance of this marker); Hugh McVay (within shouting distance of this marker); Benjamin Fitzpatrick (within shouting distance of this marker); Joshua L. Martin (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tuscaloosa.
 
Also see . . .
1. Photo of the Old Capitol Building / Central Alabama Female College. (Submitted on March 25, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
2. The Architect. William Nichols From Wikipedia. (Submitted on March 25, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
 
Categories. EducationGovernmentNotable BuildingsNotable PersonsNotable Places
 
Longitudinal Section of the Capitol Building. (The Architect Marker) image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, March 13, 2010
3. Longitudinal Section of the Capitol Building. (The Architect Marker)
East Elevation of the Capitol Building. (The Architect Marker) image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, March 13, 2010
4. East Elevation of the Capitol Building. (The Architect Marker)
Ground Floor Plan of the Capitol. (The Architect Marker) image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, March 13, 2010
5. Ground Floor Plan of the Capitol. (The Architect Marker)
Second Floor Plan of the Capitol. (The Architect Marker) image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, March 13, 2010
6. Second Floor Plan of the Capitol. (The Architect Marker)
Ground floor view of the Rotunda. image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, July 4, 2006
7. Ground floor view of the Rotunda.
The Gorgas House (1829) image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, November 17, 2008
8. The Gorgas House (1829)
The Gorgas House, designed by William Nichols was part of his design of the original campus of the newly established University of Alabama. This building was one of only four to survive the destruction of the campus by Federal Troops on April 4, 1865.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 25, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 1,133 times since then and 60 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on March 25, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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