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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Shaw in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Seventh Street Develops

Midcity at the Crossroads

 

—Shaw Heritage Trail —

 
Seventh Street Develops Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 16, 2009
1. Seventh Street Develops Marker
Inscription. In 1864 St. Patrick’s parish opened an Immaculate Conception Church for Catholics living far from its downtown F Street home. This imposing Gothic style building was completed a decade later. Renowned actress Helen Hayes was baptized here in 1900. Immaculate Conception’s community work included its Washington Catholic Hour radio show on WOL (1921-1962). For 99 years, until 1964, the church operated Immaculate Conception School for boys at 711 N Street. It is now an elementary school. Girls attended Immaculate Conception Academy nearby at Eighth and Q streets until 1954.

After much of this area was destroyed in the 1968 riots, Monsignor Joshua Mundell worked to stabilize the neighborhood, encouraging church and federal government collaborations to build modern apartments.

The Seventh Street Savings Bank building is a remnant of the block’s business era. The combination bank/residential building opened in 1912. After many mergers, it closed for good in 1983.

Seventh Street developed as a business street because of good transportation. Back in 1810, Congress chartered the Seventh Street Turnpike from Pennsylvania Avenue to Rockville, Maryland. At first omnibuses (horse-drawn wagons) carried passengers along Seventh. Then in 1862 Congress chartered street railways, with a Seventh Street line. Leading abolitionist
Seventh Street Develops Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 16, 2009
2. Seventh Street Develops Marker
photo on reverse.
Senator Charles Sumner made sure that the charter prohibited segregation on the streetcars. The first electric streetcars (1888) ran along New York Avenue to Seventh, but in 1962 were replaced by buses. The latest innovation, Metro’s Green and Yellow subway lines, opened in 1991 after seven years of construction.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 11 of 17.)
 
Location. 38° 54.427′ N, 77° 1.309′ W. Marker is in Shaw, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of 7th Street, NW and N Street, NW on 7th Street, NW. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20001, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Immaculate Conception Catholic School (within shouting distance of this marker); Immaculate Conception Catholic Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Reaching for Equality (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Community Anchors (about 500 feet away); “Sweet Daddy” Grace (about 700 feet away); Power Brokers (approx. 0.2 miles away); Blanche K. Bruce House (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Fires of 1968 (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Shaw.
 
More about this marker.
Seventh Street Develops Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 16, 2009
3. Seventh Street Develops Marker
with Immaculate Conception Church and the 7th Street Bank Building in background across the intersection.
[ Photo Captions:]
A Church of the Immaculate Conception alter boy, 1937. (Washington Post.)

Shooting hoops across N St. from church, 1972. (Washington Post.)

Renowned actress Helen Hayes was baptized in 1900 at Immaculate Conception Church where her parents married. (Courtesy of the Helen Hayes Society.)

This machine, photographed below Seventh and L sts., bored subway tunnels.
Wooden decking here covered the excavation here for Metro's Green and Yellow Lines, 1985. (Washington Post.)

Father Joshua Mundell and Immaculate Conception School children. (Immaculate Conception School.)

National Bank of Washington was the last bank to occupy the Seventh Street Bank building. (The Historical Society of Washington, D.C.)

[Photo caption on reverse:
The Brightwood Railway, one of Seventh Street's many trolley lines, ca. 1890. (The Historical Society of Washington, D.C.)
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Immaculate Conception Catholic Church is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia entry for Helen Hayes. (Submitted on November 8, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Wikipedia entry for the Washington Metro. (Submitted on November 8, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. Other Shaw Heritage Trail markers entered in the Historical Marker database. (Submitted on November 11, 2009.)
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.EducationNotable PersonsRailroads & Streetcars
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 8, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 775 times since then and 34 times this year. Last updated on April 14, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 8, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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