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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Quantico Marine Corps Base in Stafford County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Raider Hall

 
 
Raider Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., October 12, 2007
1. Raider Hall Marker
Inscription.
Marine Corps
Martial Arts Center of Excellence
One Mind
Any Weapon
Raider Hall is dedicated to all the Marine Raiders who fought and died in WWII, and embodied the physical, mental, and character discipline, which we hope to imbue in all Marines who train in this building.
 
Erected 2004 by the United States Marine Corps.
 
Location. 38° 29.878′ N, 77° 26.242′ W. Marker is in Quantico Marine Corps Base, Virginia, in Stafford County. Marker is on Gilbert Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Quantico VA 22134, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. F/A – 18A Hornet (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line but has been reported missing); Gonzalez Hall (about 600 feet away); An Established Front (about 600 feet away); In the Beginning (about 600 feet away); Growth of Training (about 600 feet away); A Period of Firsts (about 600 feet away).
 
Also see . . .
Raider Hall and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., October 12, 2007
2. Raider Hall and Marker

1. The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program. (Submitted on October 19, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.)
2. MCMAP and the Marine Warrior Ethos. An article by Captain Jamison Yi, U.S. Marine Corps, published in the November - December 2004 issue of Military Review. (Submitted on October 19, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. A Brief History of MCMAP
The Marine Corps was born during the battles that created this country. Drawing upon the experiences of the first Marines we have developed a martial culture unrivaled in the world today. This legacy includes not only our fighting prowess but also the character and soul of what makes us unique as Marines.

Beginning with the Continental Marines who were renowned as sharpshooters in the rigging of Navy ships, to their skill as boarding and landing parties where the sword and bayonet were the tools of their trade, Marines have continued to develop and hone their martial skills up to the twentieth century. Prior to and during World War I the skill of the bayonet
Official Marine Corps Martial Arts Program Logo image. Click for full size.
3. Official Marine Corps Martial Arts Program Logo
was supplemented with the first training in unarmed techniques to meet the challenges of trench warfare. Marines such as Anthony J. Drexel Biddle developed and taught bayonet and close combat techniques based upon fencing, boxing and wrestling. During the inter-war years Major Biddle and others such as Lieutenants Yeaton, Moore and Taxis, Captains W.M. Greene and Samuel B. Griffith all trained Marines and worked on developing effective programs for their units. Many of these men were influenced by their experiences while stationed with the China Marines in Shanghai. This influence included the teachings of Fairburn and Sykes.

During these early years the leadership and core values training that are our hallmark today developed in concert with the martial skills. Guided by visionary leaders, the Marine Corps developed a spirit that we know today as honor, courage and commitment.

http://www.tecom.usmc.mil/TBS/Pages/MA/philosophy/history.htm
    — Submitted October 19, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.

 
Categories. 20th CenturyMilitaryWar, World II
 
Raider Hall Dedication image. Click for full size.
By USMC Photograph, August 2004
4. Raider Hall Dedication
http://www.tecom.usmc.mil/TBS/Pages/MA/pubs_photos/photos.htm
Raider Hall Dedication image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., August 2004
5. Raider Hall Dedication
Raider Hall Dedication image. Click for full size.
By USMC Photograph, August 2004
6. Raider Hall Dedication
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 19, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,313 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 19, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.
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