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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Burlington in Alamance County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Glencoe - The Mill Buildings

Mill Design

 
 
Glencoe - The Mill Buildings Marker image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, May 22, 2010
1. Glencoe - The Mill Buildings Marker
Inscription. Mill designers planned the brick and heavy timber mill to standards of the day. They employed the Italianate style popular for industrial architecture. Its ornate brickwork, arched windows, low roof, and prominate tower suited the functional needs of textile mills. Large windows planned in proportion to the width of the building shed natural light across the large work spaces. Sturdy construction supported the heavy machinery.
The mill followed "slow burn" guidelines set by Northern insurance companies. Features included thick, tapered brick walls; heavy wooden beam framing (to char rather than burn); thick plank floors; a low-pitched roof; and a separate stair tower to prevent fires from spreading between floors. The tower once held a 10,000-gallon water tank for a sprinkler system. In 1905, the Chicago Bridge and Iron Works built a supplementary tower with a 30,000-gallon tank.
The lift at the back, right corner of the mill lifted the laps of cotton prepared in the Picker House and Dye House up to the third floor of the mill. There the main jobs were carding and roving. Male workers lifted the heavy laps onto the machines that straightened, lengthened, and loosely twisted the cotton into strands (roving) of uniform weight and strength.
On the second floor, women and (until it was outlawed in the 20th century) children
Glencoe - The Mill Buildings Marker image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, May 22, 2010
2. Glencoe - The Mill Buildings Marker
operated spinning and spooling machines, which turned the strands of "roving" into yarn and wrapped it onto spools or bobbins.
On the first floor, men and women weavers operated the looms, weaving the many colors of yarn from wooden bobbins into the trademark plaid and striped fabrics. Weaving was a high status, skilled job.
 
Location. 36° 8.325′ N, 79° 25.669′ W. Marker is near Burlington, North Carolina, in Alamance County. Marker is on Glencoe Street, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Glencoe Village is 3 miles north of Burlington, NC from NC Highway 62. Marker is in this post office area: Burlington NC 27215, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Glencoe - Power, Wheel House and Turbine (here, next to this marker); Glencoe - Picker House and Dye House (here, next to this marker); Glencoe - Life in the Mill Village (a few steps from this marker); Glencoe Management Houses (within shouting distance of this marker); Glencoe - Company Office and Store (within shouting distance of this marker); The Rise of the Textile Mill Communities (within shouting distance of this marker); Living in a Mill-Centered World
Three Markers : The Mill Buildings image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, May 22, 2010
3. Three Markers : The Mill Buildings
The Mill Design Marker is on The Left.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Neighbors Divided (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Burlington.
 
Also see . . .
1. Glencoe Research Forum. This website provides information on historic Glencoe Mill and the restored mill village. (Submitted on June 5, 2010, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina.) 

2. Glencoe Textile Heritage Museum. (Submitted on June 5, 2010, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina.)
 
Additional keywords. Textiles, Glencoe Cotton Mills, Alamance, Burlington, Holt, fabric
 
Categories. 20th CenturyIndustry & CommerceNotable Buildings
 
Glencoe - The Mill Buildings Marker image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, June 27, 2010
4. Glencoe - The Mill Buildings Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 5, 2010, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 923 times since then and 118 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 5, 2010, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina.   4. submitted on June 29, 2010, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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