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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ridgefield in Fairfield County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Benedict Arnold's Betrayal and Lieutenant Joshua King

Ridgefield, Connecticut

 

—The Museum in the Streets —

 
Benedict Arnold's Betrayal and Lieutenant Joshua King Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, June 2, 2010
1. Benedict Arnold's Betrayal and Lieutenant Joshua King Marker
Inscription.
On September 23, 1780, on his way through American lines to New York City, Major John Andre of the British Army was captured, taken prisoner and brought to American headquarters in South Salem, N.Y. Andre had plotted with General Benedict Arnold to betray the American fortress at West Point and when captured was found to have concealed the plans of West Point in his boot. Lt. Joshua King was given the charge of watching over Andre until he was hanged as a spy on October 2, 1780. Lt. King and his Revolutionary friend, Lt. James Dole lived in Ridgefield after the war and opened their mercantile store, which was to become known as "Old Hundred." The business changed names many times during the next 100 years until the last one moved to the corner of Main Street and Bailey Avenue where it was known for almost another century as Bedient's Hardware. Today "Old Hundred" in incorporated into the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.
Lieutenant Joshua King married the daughter of the Rev. Jonathan Ingersoll and built the first of the King mansions on the corner of Main St. and King Lane. The first house burned to the ground and the present structure was built further back on the property. J. Howard King and his brother, General Rufus King, descendants of Joshua, were instrumental in developing High Ridge, encouraging many prominent
Benedict Arnold's Betrayal and Lieutenant Joshua King Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, June 2, 2010
2. Benedict Arnold's Betrayal and Lieutenant Joshua King Marker
The marker in front of the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
New Yorkers to build their summer homes on the ridge and other locations throughout the town. (Marker Number 22.)
 
Location. 41° 16.606′ N, 73° 29.86′ W. Marker is in Ridgefield, Connecticut, in Fairfield County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (Connecticut Route 35) and King Lane, on the right when traveling north on Main Street. Touch for map. Located in front of the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 258 Main Street, Ridgefield CT 06877, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Rev. Thomas Hawley House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Town Common and Hauley House (within shouting distance of this marker); Ridgefield Veterans Monument (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Ridgefield's Colonial Plans (about 500 feet away); Ridgefield Veterans Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Confederate Bell (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Lounsbury House (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Original Episcopal Church (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ridgefield.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Take the Museum in the Streets Walking Tour in Ridgefield, Connecticut.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWar, US Revolutionary
 
The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, June 2, 2010
3. The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
"Old Hundred" Marker on the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, June 2, 2010
4. "Old Hundred" Marker on the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 18, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 1,729 times since then and 89 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 18, 2010, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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