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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Georgetown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

First Baptist Church, Georgetown

2624 Dumbarton Street, NW

 

—African American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC —

 
First Baptist Church, Georgetown Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 27, 2010
1. First Baptist Church, Georgetown Marker
Inscription.
The first Baptist church established in Georgetown was funded in 1862 by the Reverend Sandy Alexander (1818-1902), a former slave who led the church until 1889. Among the founding members was Collins Williams, a preacher from Fredericksburg, Virginia, who with his wife Betsey had been leading religious meetings in private homes. Rev. Alexander’s congregation, expanded by the arrival of a group from Fredericksburg, first met in a small frame structure known as “the Ark” on land at 29th and O Streets, donated by the Williamses. In 1882, congregants laid the cornerstone for the current building, financing it in part with the proceeds of Rev. Alexander’s speaking tour through the northern states.

[Photo caption:]
Members of First Baptist Church, Georgetown, 1930s
First Baptist Church Georgetown

Georgetown Historic District, DC
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC - Funded by the DC Historic Preservation Office.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Washington, DC African American Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 54.457′ N, 77° 3.341′ W. Marker is in Georgetown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at
"First Baptist Church, Georgetown, DC" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 27, 2010
2. "First Baptist Church, Georgetown, DC"
the intersection of Dumbarton Street, NW and 27th Street, NW, on the right when traveling east on Dumbarton Street, NW. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2624 Dumbarton Street, NW, Washington DC 20007, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Margaret Peters and Roumania Peters Walker (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mount Zion United Methodist Church and Heritage Center, and the Female Union Band Cemetery (about 700 feet away); Mt. Zion United Methodist Church Parsonage (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Colonial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Dumbarton House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Georgetown Refuge (approx. 0.2 miles away); Ross and Getty House (approx. ¼ mile away); Thomas Sim Lee Corner (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Georgetown.
 
Also see . . .  First Baptist Church, Georgetown: "Our History". (Submitted on July 30, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches, Etc.Landmarks
 
First Baptist Church, Georgetown Marker - Historic American Building Survey image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 27, 2010
3. First Baptist Church, Georgetown Marker - Historic American Building Survey
First Baptist Church, Georgetown Markers image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 27, 2010
4. First Baptist Church, Georgetown Markers
First Baptist Church, Georgetown image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 27, 2010
5. First Baptist Church, Georgetown
First Baptist Church, Georgetown HABS marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 8, 2015
6. First Baptist Church, Georgetown HABS marker
W. D. Abrams Annex at the First Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 12, 2016
7. W. D. Abrams Annex at the First Baptist Church
This additional marker is along the western side of the church on 27th St., NW and reads: W. D. Abrams Annex, First Baptist Church, Georgetown, dedicates this building in memory of its ninth pastor, Wellington D. Abrams, who served this church faithfully from 1963 to 1988., C.J. Malloy, Jr. Pastor, November 16, 1997
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 12, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 30, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,027 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 30, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   6. submitted on October 12, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   7. submitted on September 12, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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