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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Eatonton in Putnam County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Site of John C. Mason's Dwelling House

 
 
Side 1: Site of John C. Mason's Dwelling House Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, February 19, 2005
1. Side 1: Site of John C. Mason's Dwelling House Marker
Inscription. (Side 1):
John C. Mason, native of S.C., came to Putnam Co. from Hancock Co. with his wife Abigail and several small children. He bought this lot, Square E lot 4, on the first day lots were sold in Eatonton, April 15, 1808. He was a unique citizen. Of all those who bought lots on that first day, only he built his dwelling house, became successful and influential in the development of the town, and died at home on his original lot, Jan. 14, 1847. He was one of the first town commissioners appointed by the legislature Dec. 12, 1809 and was elected to that office many times over a period of thirty years. He was a trustee of the first Union Academy and later Eatonton Academy, legislator, Mason, director of the Branch Bank, and deacon of the Eatonton Baptist Church.

Five of Mason's six known children married and remained in Eatonton. Ann Young was married to John Hudson, bank cashier; Elizabeth, to Wm. C. Davis, county treasurer for years; Mary Ann to James Nicholson, soldier in the War of 1812 and holder of many county offices; Caroline, to Joseph A. Moseley; Alfred C., to Caroline Waller. All were members of the Eatonton Baptist Church except Ann and John Hudson, Methodists, and Alfred, a Presbyterian elder. Wylie W. Mason, lawyer and licensed to preach in 1825 by the Eatonton Baptist Church, moved to Alabama in 1837
Side 2: Site of John C. Mason's Dwelling House Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, February 19, 2005
2. Side 2: Site of John C. Mason's Dwelling House Marker
and became prominent in state and church affairs. See other side

(Side 2):
Continued from other side

The dwelling house was owned by members of the Mason family until 1863. After a series of owners (during which time it was rented by William Jefferson who printed the first Eatonton Messenger, then Press and Messenger in 1867) the house was bought by the deacons of the Eatonton Baptist Church for a pastorium, May 29, 1891. Five years later the house was taken down and rebuilt as a modern Victorian cottage about hundred feet to the south, leaving room on the corner for the new church, the corner stone being laid June 24, 1896. The Eatonton Baptist Church constituted Nov. 17, 1818, worshipped in the Union Church from the dedication March 24, 1820 until its church building was dedicated March 21, 1897. The cornerstone of the present building was laid May 26, 1941. At that time the pastorium was moved to the rear of the church. No longer in use, the house was razed in July 1974.
 
Erected 1977 by Eatonton Baptist Church.
 
Location. 33° 19.623′ N, 83° 23.432′ W. Marker is in Eatonton, Georgia, in Putnam County. Marker is at the intersection of North Madison Avenue and West Harris Street, on the left when traveling
Site of John C. Mason's Dwelling House Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 4, 2010
3. Site of John C. Mason's Dwelling House Marker
north on North Madison Avenue. Touch for map. The marker stands at the First Baptist Church of Eatonton (the present name of the Church). Marker is in this post office area: Eatonton GA 31024, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Bronson House (within shouting distance of this marker); Putnam County Confederate Monument (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Stoneman Raid (about 500 feet away); Putnam County (about 600 feet away); The March to the Sea (about 600 feet away); Veterans Flagpole (about 700 feet away); Putnam County Veterans Monument (about 700 feet away); Branch Bank of the State of Georgia at Eatonton (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Eatonton.
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Settlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 3, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 634 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 3, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   3. submitted on August 19, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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