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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mayville in Dodge County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Wisconsinís First Iron Smelter

 
 
Wisconsinís First Iron Smelter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul F, October 13, 2010
1. Wisconsinís First Iron Smelter Marker
Inscription. Mayville was founded in 1845 by Alvin and William Foster and Chester and S.P. May. Iron ore was discovered by these men approximately four miles south of Mayville. A quantity of the ore was taken to the nearest iron smelter in Mishawaka, Indiana, in 1846.

In 1847 Judge Alonzo Kinyon promoted a company chartered as the Wisconsin Iron Company. Construction of the first furnace was started at Mayville in 1848 approximately 500 feet southwest of this marker. In 1849 the furnace cast its first molten iron yielding about 12 tons per day, using charcoal from native hardwoods for fuel.

The industry prospered for 79 years, modernizing with the times to an eventual 800 tons of iron per day capacity. It once occupied the entire marker area as well as adjacent acreage. Due to curtailed demand for pig iron, the plant closed permanently in 1928. The last owner was The Mayville Iron Company.
 
Erected 1973 by the Wisconsin Historical Society. (Marker Number 193.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Wisconsin Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 43° 30.403′ N, 88° 32.516′ W. Marker is in Mayville, Wisconsin, in Dodge County. Marker is on North Main Street (State Highway
Wisconsinís First Iron Smelter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Eric Kuntz, June 1, 2014
2. Wisconsinís First Iron Smelter Marker
New marker - replaced 2013
28 & 67) half a mile north of Horicon Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located on North Main Street at the Lower Mill Pond Bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Mayville WI 53050, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Soldiers and Sailors Monument (approx. 0.6 miles away); Berthold "Pete" Husting (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Mayville White Limestone School Building (approx. 0.6 miles away); Hollenstein Wagon and Carriage Factory (approx. ĺ mile away); Solomon Juneau House (approx. 4.6 miles away); World War II (approx. 6.7 miles away); War Memorial (approx. 7.4 miles away); Horicon Marsh (approx. 10.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mayville.
 
Additional comments.
1. Marker Replacement
This marker was replaced in 2013 due to the deteriorated condition of the original marker. In addition, several corrections were made. The new marker was dedicated on June 1, 2014. Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted June 1, 2014, by Eric Kuntz of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin.

 
Categories. Industry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers
 
Wisconsinís First Iron Smelter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Eric Kuntz, June 1, 2014
3. Wisconsinís First Iron Smelter Marker
New marker - replaced 2013
Wisconsinís First Iron Smelter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Eric Kuntz, June 1, 2014
4. Wisconsinís First Iron Smelter Marker
New marker dedication ceremony - June 1, 2014
Wisconsinís First Iron Smelter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul F, October 13, 2010
5. Wisconsinís First Iron Smelter Marker
Marker and Mill Pond Dam
Wisconsinís First Iron Smelter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Paul F, October 13, 2010
6. Wisconsinís First Iron Smelter Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 13, 2010, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 825 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 13, 2010, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin.   2, 3, 4. submitted on June 1, 2014, by Eric Kuntz of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin.   5, 6. submitted on October 13, 2010, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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