Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lundy in Mono County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Lundy

 
 
Lundy Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lester J Letson, September 11, 2010
1. Lundy Marker
Location of the May Lundy Mine and the W. J. Lundy Sawmill
Inscription. Home of the May Lundy Mine. Site of W. J. Lundy sawmill supplying lumber to Bodie in 1878. Organized as the Homer Mining District in 1879 by Wasson, Nye and Homer. Plagued by snowslides and partially destroyed by fire in 1886, Lundy's page of Mono County's history reads wild, rugged and raw but her gold was rich and yellow. Dedicated June 10, 1967 Bodie Chapter of E Clampus Vitus Mono County Board of Supervisors
 
Erected 1967 by Bodie Chapter E Clampus Vitus and Mono County Board of Supervisors.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 38° 1.668′ N, 119° 14.417′ W. Marker is in Lundy, California, in Mono County. Marker is on Lundy Lake Road 7 miles west of U.S. 395, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker and campground are located at the end of Lundy Lake Road. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5901 Lundy Lake Road, Bridgeport CA 93517, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Avalanche of 1911 (approx. 4.4 miles away); Mono Diggins (approx. 4.7 miles away); Grave of Adeline Carson Stilts (approx.
Lundy Marker and Safes image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, October 22, 2011
2. Lundy Marker and Safes
4.8 miles away); The Tioga Pass Road (approx. 6 miles away); Would-Be Miners and Occasional Tourists (approx. 6 miles away); Bennettville (approx. 6.2 miles away); Sheriff James P. Dolan (approx. 6.8 miles away); From Scrubland to Ranchland (approx. 8 miles away).
 
More about this marker. On either side of the Lundy marker sit two old safes that at one time held the gold processed in the area. The old safes have seen better days.
 
Regarding Lundy. The town of Lundy was originally known as Mill Creek. The post office closed in 1914. Much of the town ended up below Lundy Lake after the dam was built, but the campground at the end of the paved road occupies part of the original town area. O.J. Lundy, his wife and two daughters, including May Lundy left Mono County in 1882 and moved to Fresno, California where they lived out their lives.

The Lundy sawmill cut local timber which was carted by wagon to Bodie. Visitors to the Bodie National Monument will be seeing buildings built with wood from Lundy. Although Lundy is long gone, the wood used to build the town of Bodie remains.
 
Also see . . .
Lundy Marker and Safes image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, October 22, 2011
3. Lundy Marker and Safes
 Lundy. Pictures of the remains of the May Lundy Mine located above the historic town of Lundy. (Submitted on November 6, 2010, by Lester J Letson of Fresno, California.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNatural ResourcesSettlements & Settlers
 
Lundy Marker with Campground and Mountain in the Background image. Click for full size.
By Lester J Letson, September 11, 2010
4. Lundy Marker with Campground and Mountain in the Background
The Lundy marker is flanked by two old safes. Part of the campground is visible in the background
Lundy Lake image. Click for full size.
By Lester J Letson, September 11, 2010
5. Lundy Lake
Part of the town of Lundy now sits below Lundy Lake
Lundy Cabin image. Click for full size.
By Lester J Letson, September 11, 2010
6. Lundy Cabin
One of the remote cabins, part of the Lundy Campground.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 5, 2010, by Lester J Letson of Fresno, California. This page has been viewed 1,089 times since then and 52 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 5, 2010, by Lester J Letson of Fresno, California.   2, 3. submitted on October 27, 2011, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.   4, 5, 6. submitted on November 5, 2010, by Lester J Letson of Fresno, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement