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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Capitol Hill in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Old Brick Capitol

[Old Capitol Prison]

 

[U.S. Supreme Court Building National Historic Landmark]

 
The Old Brick Capitol Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 30, 2010
1. The Old Brick Capitol Marker
Inscription.
The Old Brick Capitol
July 4, 1815
The cornerstone of the Old Brick Capitol
built by Washington citizens
to house the Congress
was laid on this site.
The Congress met here from December 13, 1815
through March 3, 1819.
President Monroe was inaugurated here in 1817,
establishing the custom of public inaugurations.

 
Erected 1950 by National Capital Sesquicentennial Commission.
 
Location. 38° 53.45′ N, 77° 0.336′ W. Marker is in Capitol Hill, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from 1st Street, NE north of East Capitol Street when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is on the inside of the perimeter wall surrounding the plaza west on the U.S. Supreme Court Building, at the northwest corner off the 1st Street sidewalk. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20543, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. United States Capitol (within shouting distance of this marker); United States Capitol Grounds (within shouting distance of this marker); From June to December, 1917 (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Sewall-Belmont House & Museum
Old Capitol Prison/Old Brick Capitol image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
2. Old Capitol Prison/Old Brick Capitol
(about 700 feet away); Residence of Albert Gallatin (about 700 feet away); Alva Belmont House (about 700 feet away); Fiery Destruction (about 800 feet away); Cortelyou House (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Capitol Hill.
 
Also see . . .
1. Old Capitol Prison. (Submitted on January 2, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Supreme Court of the United States - the Court Building (1935). (Submitted on January 2, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Old Capitol Prison; "American Bastille".
 
Categories. GovernmentLandmarksNotable Buildings
 
The Old Brick Capitol Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 30, 2010
3. The Old Brick Capitol Marker
View of the U.S. Supreme Court Building image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 30, 2010
4. View of the U.S. Supreme Court Building
- the Old Brick Capitol Marker is located on the low wall at far left.
"Equal Justice Under Law" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 30, 2010
5. "Equal Justice Under Law"
U.S. Supreme Court, NHL - west portico c
"Justice: the Guardian of Liberty." image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 30, 2010
6. "Justice: the Guardian of Liberty."
U.S. Supreme Court, NHL - east face.
The Old Brick Capitol image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 13, 2013
7. The Old Brick Capitol
After the British burned the Capitol building in August of 1814 the Congress met in this building, until 1819. During the Civil War it became the Old Capitol Prison and housed captured Confederates and spies like Rose O'Neil Greenhow. In 1921 Alva Belmont bought it for the National Woman's Party. It was razed in 1929 and replaced by the Supreme Court Building.
Close-up of image on marker
Deed of the Old Brick Capitol to National Woman's Party by Alva Belmont image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 12, 2013
8. Deed of the Old Brick Capitol to National Woman's Party by Alva Belmont
Alva Belmont bought the Old Brick Capitol and deeded it to the National Woman's Party in 1921, the year after the 19th amendment was ratified. The New York Times referred to the building across the street from the Capitol as a “watch tower to keep close supervision of Congress and its doings.” In 1929 the Old Brick Capitol was taken by eminent domain and torn down to make way for today's Supreme Court building. The NWP moved to the nearby Sewall-Belmont House where this deed is on display.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 10, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 2, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,220 times since then and 60 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 2, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   7, 8. submitted on October 13, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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