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Fort Johnson, James Island in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Site of Fort Johnson

 
 
Site of Fort Johnson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 6, 2011
1. Site of Fort Johnson Marker
Inscription.
Site of
Fort Johnson
In 1776
Prior to the battle of Sullivan's Island
General William Moultrie here raised
The First Flag of Liberty

This building was a unit of the fort.
(Emblem: D.A.R.)
Placed by Rebecca Motte Chapter
Daughters of the American Revolution
1934

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 32° 45.092′ N, 79° 53.877′ W. Marker is in Fort Johnson, James Island, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Fort Johnson Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Located near the Northeastern Terminus of Fort Johnson Road. Marker is in this post office area: Charleston SC 29412, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The First Shot of the War of Secession (a few steps from this marker); Grice Marine Laboratory (within shouting distance of this marker); Marshlands House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Battery Cheves (approx. 1.1 miles away); Sally Port (approx. 1.3 miles away); Powder Magazine
Site of Fort Johnson Marker Powder Magazine image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 6, 2011
2. Site of Fort Johnson Marker Powder Magazine
This 18th century powder magazine was discovered in the 20th century after spending about 200 years underground. The fort that once stood here covered this magazine with earth to protect it from shelling, and when that got covered up, people forgot about the magazine underneath. It was found during construction and has been preserved.
(approx. 1.3 miles away); Casemates and Cannon (approx. 1.3 miles away); 42-Pounder, Banded and Rifled (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Johnson, James Island.
 
Regarding Site of Fort Johnson. National Register of Historic Places:
Fort Johnson/Powder Magazine *** (added 1972 - Site - #72001197)
About 3 mi. SE of Charleston on James Island, Charleston
♦ Historic Significance: Event, Information Potential
♦ Area of Significance: Historic - Non-Aboriginal, Military, Politics/Government
♦ Cultural Affiliation: English
♦ Period of Significance: 1700-1749, 1750-1799, 1850-1874
♦ Owner: State
♦ Historic Function: Defense
♦ Historic Sub-function: Fortification
 
Additional comments.
1.
Fort Johnson is significant both militarily and politically, especially as the site of the first raising of the South Carolina flag in 1775 and as the site of the first shots fired upon Fort Sumter in 1861. Of the fort itself, only considerably eroded Confederate earthworks remain, although other elements
Site of Fort Johnson Marker Powder Magazine image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 6, 2011
3. Site of Fort Johnson Marker Powder Magazine
of the fortís foundations are discernable from ground swells and rubble. Fort Johnson was one of the first defensive works constructed to protect the harbor or Charleston against naval attack. The initial fortification was constructed by the British during the years 1704-08 for defense against the French fleet during Queen Anneís War. The fort was named for Sir Nathaniel Johnson, Proprietary Governor of the Carolinas from 1703 to 1709. There was continual reconstruction of the fort from 1704 to 1865, due primarily to damage incurred by storms and to ever-changing military situations. Although the fort itself is in ruins, the powder magazine, erected in 1765, is intact. The powder magazine was buried until 1961; this fact probably saved the building from destruction (the magazine was buried during the Civil War by Confederate soldiers). The building is 27 feet long and 20 feet wide, constructed of brick in Flemish bond, and was originally whitewashed. The front and rear gables are high, with one-dimensional linear extension at their bases on the roofline; the roof is covered with a cement-like coating to prevent it from taking fire. While the exterior is original, the interior is barrel vaulted, probably by the Confederate forces during the early 1860s, to enable the roof to withstand the pressure of the earth when the building was buried. Listed in the National Register September
Site of Fort Johnson Powder Magazine rear view image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 6, 2011
4. Site of Fort Johnson Powder Magazine rear view
14, 1972.(South Carolina Department of Archives and History)
    — Submitted February 4, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Site of Fort Johnson National Geodetic Survey 1933, No. 1 image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 6, 2011
5. Site of Fort Johnson National Geodetic Survey 1933, No. 1
Site of Fort Johnson National Geodetic Survey 1934, 1983, No. 3 image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 6, 2011
6. Site of Fort Johnson National Geodetic Survey 1934, 1983, No. 3
Powder Magazine image. Click for full size.
S.C. Dept of Archives and History
7. Powder Magazine
National Register of Historic Places: Fort Johnson/Powder Magazine *** (added 1972 - Site - #72001197) Fort Johnson is significant both militarily and politically, especially as the site of the first raising of the South Carolina flag in 1775 and as the site of the first shots fired upon Fort Sumter in 1861. Of the fort itself, only considerably eroded Confederate earthworks remain, although other elements of the fortís foundations are discernable from ground swells and rubble. Fort Johnson was one of the first defensive works constructed to protect the harbor or Charleston against naval attack. The initial fortification was constructed by the British during the years 1704-08 for defense against the French fleet during Queen Anneís War. The fort was named for Sir Nathaniel Johnson, Proprietary Governor of the Carolinas from 1703 to 1709. There was continual reconstruction of the fort from 1704 to 1865, due primarily to damage incurred by storms and to ever-changing military situations. Although the fort itself is in ruins, the powder magazine, erected in 1765, is intact.
Cisterns image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
8. Cisterns
In this view, you see two freshwater cisterns from the original Fort Johnson, with the powder magazine in the background.
Site of Fort Johnson Powder Magazine with cistern image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 20, 2010
9. Site of Fort Johnson Powder Magazine with cistern
Site of Fort Johnson , nearby marker for "The First Shot of the War of Secession " image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 6, 2011
10. Site of Fort Johnson , nearby marker for "The First Shot of the War of Secession "
* see nearby markers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 4, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,040 times since then and 68 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 4, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   7, 8. submitted on April 21, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   9, 10. submitted on February 4, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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