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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Benicia in Solano County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Commodore Jones Point

 
 
Commodore Jones Point Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 12, 2011
1. Commodore Jones Point Marker
Inscription. Named for Thomas Ap Catesby Jones, founder of the Naval Academy and War of 1812 hero. As Commander of the Pacific Fleet, Jones landed at Monterey 1842, raising the Stars and Stripes under misapprehension of war with Mexico. From 1848 to 1850 he again served as commander, advocating development of Benicia. Southhampton Bay (to the west) is named after his store ship.

Dedicated by
Native Sons of the Golden West
May 30, 1982
Joseph Ursino, Grand President
In Memory of
James D. Phelan, U.S. Senator

 
Erected 1982 by Native Sons of the Golden West.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West marker series.
 
Location. 38° 3.517′ N, 122° 10.504′ W. Marker is in Benicia, California, in Solano County. Marker can be reached from West Ninth Street near West I Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Benicia CA 94510, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Turner/Robertson Shipyard (approx. 0.3 miles away); McNear Warehouse (approx. one mile away); The Burlington Hotel (approx. one
Commodore Jones Point - additional plaque below the main marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 12, 2011
2. Commodore Jones Point - additional plaque below the main marker
Mounted on the monument below the main marker is a plaque that reads, "Plaza in memory of Charline D. Erwin, 1908-1891. Member of pioneer family. Historian-benefactor. Benicia Historical Society."
mile away); Site of the First Protestant Church in California (approx. one mile away); Fischer-Hanlon House (approx. 1.1 miles away); Founders of Benicia (approx. 1.1 miles away); Robert Semple (approx. 1.1 miles away); Old State Capitol (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Benicia.
 
More about this marker. The marker is mounted on a low stone-and-cement monument at the foot of the flagpole in Ninth Street Park.
 
Also see . . .  The Pacific Theater of Naval Warfare in the Mexican-American War. The California State Military Museum's article on US Pacific naval operations against Mexico: "... Although war with Mexico did not break out until 12/13 May 1846, the United States Navy conducted operations against Mexico in the Pacific almost four years earlier. In September 1842, Commodore Thomas ap Catesby Jones was in command of the Pacific fleet, which at the time included the frigate United States and the sloop Cyane. Jones had learned in Lima, Peru that war with Mexico had broken out and that England had purchased California
Commodore Jones Point Marker - view looking WNW image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 12, 2011
3. Commodore Jones Point Marker - view looking WNW
The monument and marker sit just to the right of the flagpole. In the background, Southampton Bay (into which the USS Southampton, under Jones' command, sailed in 1849) is visible to the left of the flagpole, while the location of the Turner Shipyard is visible just to the right of the flagpole.
from Mexico in a secret treaty for $7 million. Jones invoked the Monroe Doctrine and set sail for the Monterey, California’s capital. On 19 October 1842, The Pacific fleet of the Cyane, Dale, and the United States arrived at the harbor in Monterey. Jones sent his second in command, Captain James Armstrong, ashore to demand the surrender of California. Monterey was given until 9:00 am the next day to surrender. The next morning, the pacific fleet landed 100 sailors and 50 marines, but Monterey, with its poor defenses and only 58 soldiers, offered no resistance. Jones, however, had acted prematurely. On 21 October, he went ashore himself and discovered that war had not broken out and that no treaty with England existed. He replaced the American Flag and saluted the Mexican colors he had hoisted as he left the harbor. Luckily, no lives were lost by either side. Jones was later relieved of his command."
(Submitted on March 18, 2011.) 
 
Categories. Military
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 18, 2011, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 783 times since then and 53 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 18, 2011, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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