Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Burlington in Alamance County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

North Carolina Railroad

 
 
North Carolina Railroad Marker at the Historic Depot image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 4, 2010
1. North Carolina Railroad Marker at the Historic Depot
Inscription. Company shops built here in 1857 for maintenance and repair of the N.C. Railroad. Closed in 1866.
 
Erected 1972 by Office Of Archives And History. (Marker Number G 89.)
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 36° 5.627′ N, 79° 26.201′ W. Marker was in Burlington, North Carolina, in Alamance County. Marker was on Main Street. Touch for map. Located at the Historic Depot in downtown Burlington, at the intersection of S. Main Street and W. Front Street. Marker was at or near this postal address: 200 South Main Street, Burlington NC 27215, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this location, measured as the crow flies. Johnston Moves West (within shouting distance of this marker); Norfolk & Western Caboose #518654 (within shouting distance of this marker); Camp Alamance (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pine Hill Cemetery - Veterans Memorial (approx. mile away); Dentzel Carousel (approx. 1.1 miles away); Pioneer Plant (approx. 1.3 miles away); J. Spencer Love (approx. 1.3 miles away); Henry Jerome Stockard (approx. 1.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Burlington.
 
More about this marker. The Historic
Historic Depot and Granite Statues Depicting Railroad Scenes image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 4, 2010
2. Historic Depot and Granite Statues Depicting Railroad Scenes
Depot was built in 1892 as a "Southern Railway Passenger Station" and has been restored as a Burlington Historic Property. Three granite statues circle an original stone railroad turntable. The statue of "Passengers" portrays a turn of the century family preparing to board a train. "Shop Crew" shows two repairmen working on a piston rod with a large wrench. A "Road Gang" of four men is ready to work on the railroad.

Beside the depot is a time capsule, placed in 1979, which contains memorabilia and historical information dating back to the time when Burlington was Company Shops. It is to be opened in 2079.

Behind the depot, a restored red caboose is open to the public. Times vary.

Inside the depot is a wall mural depicting scenes from Burlington's history 1893 - 1993. An outdoor amphitheater with a fountain is available for concerts, family gatherings and weddings.
 
Regarding North Carolina Railroad. In his book, Company Shops: The Town Built By a Railroad, Durward T. Stokes relates the history of early Burlington and the railroad that runs through the town.

Construction began on the NC Railroad in 1851. There was soon a pressing need for a maintenance and repair facility, and in 1856, Company Shops was created.

The original Company Shops railroad repair facilities were located
Men Hard at Work image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 4, 2010
3. Men Hard at Work
approximately 100 yards East South East of the marker. Railroad tracks were mounted on the stone so that locomotives could be driven onto the turntable. The stone could then be rotated and the locomotive driven off in another direction.

The essential buildings were completed by 1859 and included two machine shops, a carpenter shop and a blacksmith shop. All of these were brick two-story buildings. A dry kiln and a foundry, both of brick, were built nearby. The wooden engine shed, or "roundhouse" was actually rectangular, and when it was replaced with a brick structure a few years later, it was said to be the largest brick structure in the state.

The first engine built at Company Shops was completed in 1868.

The North Carolina Railroad operated repair facilities here until 1886, and the shops were reopened briefly between 1890 and 1897. The family of James M. Atwater preserved the turntable from the mid 1930s until 1981 when it was moved to this depot site.

The town's name was changed to Burlington in 1887 and freight and passenger trains still rumble through on the tracks. The historic depot is no longer used, there is a modern train station across the street.
 
Additional keywords. Alamance, Train, Depot, Repair, James M. Atwater Family, Piedmont, Central,
Railroad Turntable Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 4, 2010
4. Railroad Turntable Plaque
Graham, Mebane, Mebanesville, Burlington

 
Categories. Industry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars
 
Road Gang image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 4, 2010
5. Road Gang
Historic Depot Erected 1892 image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 4, 2010
6. Historic Depot Erected 1892
Time Capsule 2079 image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 4, 2010
7. Time Capsule 2079
The Historic Depot image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 4, 2010
8. The Historic Depot
The Restored Caboose image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, March 4, 2010
9. The Restored Caboose
North Carolina Railroad Marker is Missing image. Click for full size.
By Patrick G. Jordan, June 9, 2011
10. North Carolina Railroad Marker is Missing
A staff member at the historic depot said that it was hit by a car.
North Carolina Railroad Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, December 29, 2016
11. North Carolina Railroad Marker
Marker found on display at the NC Transportation Museum in Spencer, NC.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 1, 2017. This page originally submitted on March 4, 2010, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,665 times since then and 33 times this year. Last updated on June 10, 2011, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on March 4, 2010, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina.   10. submitted on June 10, 2011, by Patrick G. Jordan of Burlington, North Carolina.   11. submitted on April 1, 2017, by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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