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Downieville in Sierra County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Sierra County, California

 
 
Sierra County, California Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, June 27, 2011
1. Sierra County, California Marker
Inscription. California gained statehood on September 8, 1850. It did so comprised of 27 counties with this area a part of Yuba County.

“The disadvantages of belonging to Yuba County were early felt; Marysville was too distant and a county government located at that place was to the citizen’s here as useless as one in Kamtchatka. The trouble, expense and the time required to send criminals to Marysville were so great that many escaped the punishments for their acts, while others were severely dealt with by Judge Lynch. No protection whatever was afforded by the Yuba government, and no benefit whatever was derived from it; in fact, the only official who at all interested himself and paid a visit to the region, was the tax collector, who failed not to scrape together all he could.”

Therefore, on April 16, 1852, Governor John Bigler signed legislation to establish Sierra County, the 31st county of the 31st state, described as follows:

“Beginning at a point in the middle of the middle branch of Yuba River, ten miles from the mouth, running thence in a north-westerly direction to a point of the north branch of Yuba River, known as Cut Eye Foster’s Bar, thence westerly to a point on dividing ridge between the waters of Feather and Yuba Rivers, known as the Lexington House, leaving said house in Yuba County, thence northerly, following out said ridge; thence easterly in a straight line to the boundary line of the state; thence south along said boundary line to a point east of the middle branch of Yuba
Sierra County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, June 27, 2011
2. Sierra County Courthouse
Marker is mounted on the front of the building to the left of the entrance door.
River and north-east corner of Nevada County; thence west following the northerly line of Nevada County; to the place beginning. The seat of justice shall be at Downieville.”

April 16, 2002
1852 Sesquicentennial 2002
Board of Supervisors
Arnold Gutman, District One • Peter Huebner, District Two, Chairman • Bill Nunes, District Three • Brooks Mitchell, District Four • Patricia Whitley, District Five

History of Plumas, Lassen and Sierra Counties, Pariss & Smith, 1882
 
Erected 2002 by County Board of Supervisors, Sierra County.
 
Location. 39° 33.536′ N, 120° 49.808′ W. Marker is in Downieville, California, in Sierra County. Marker can be reached from Courthouse Square near Galloway Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 Courthouse Square, Downieville CA 95936, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Mountain Howitzers (here, next to this marker); Sierra County Sheriff’s Gallows (a few steps from this marker); Henness Pass Road - Downieville (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hirshfeldter Building (about 700 feet away); Masonic Building (about 700 feet away); Downieville Veterans Memorial (about 700 feet away); In Memory of Juanita (about 700 feet away); Craycroft Building (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Downieville.
 
Also see . . .
Sierra County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, June 27, 2011
3. Sierra County Courthouse

1. Sierra County History. The county was once home to both the Maidu and Washoe Indians, but today’s history is tied to the Gold Rush. The discovery of gold resulted in some 16,000 miners settling the county between 1848 and 1860. (Submitted on June 27, 2011.) 

2. Politcal History of Nineteenth Century Sierra County. This publication of the Sierra County Historical Society gives a detailed account of the politics of early Sierra County. (Submitted on June 28, 2011.) 

3. David Gould Webber. This biography published in The Sierran, a Sierra County Historical Society newsletter, tells a detailed account of David Webber who superintended the building of the first wagon road to Downieville., the first bridge across the Yuba River, and the County Courthouse, jail and jailor’s house. (Submitted on October 25, 2011.) 
 
Categories. GovernmentPolitics
 
Sierra County Seal image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, June 27, 2011
4. Sierra County Seal
This bronze plaque is embedded in the concrete at the foot of the stairs leading to the entrance of the courthouse.
Mine Car on Display on the Courthouse Grounds image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, June 27, 2011
5. Mine Car on Display on the Courthouse Grounds
This reminder of Sierra County's heritage was donated to the citizens of Sierra County by
Nellie P. Huffman
In memory of her husband
Vernon Wills Huffman
A resident of Downieville for 47 years with a lifelong involvement and interests in mining throughout Sierra County
Old County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, circa 1850
6. Old County Courthouse
Library of Congress - HABS CA-1687
Photocopy of photograph (from Wells Fargo Bank Historical Museum, c. 1850) Photographer unknown, date unknown.
Sierra County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By Roger Sturtevant, Photographer, March 29, 1934
7. Sierra County Courthouse
Library of Congress, HABS CA-1402
This building burned in 1947 and the current courthouse was then built.
Part of the Old Court House image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, June 27, 2011
8. Part of the Old Court House
This building is located behind the gallows. The sign propped in front says:
Vault Built in 1854
Part of the Old Court House
destroyed by fire in 1947.
Doors from original vault.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 27, 2011, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 598 times since then and 58 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 27, 2011, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   6, 7. submitted on June 27, 2011.   8. submitted on June 27, 2011, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.
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