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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Albuquerque in Bernalillo County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

La Jornada

 
 
La Jornada Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 22, 2011
1. La Jornada Marker
Inscription. On January 26, 1598, amid embraces and farewells, Governor Juan de Oņate left Santa Barbara, in present day Chihuahua, leading an expedition bound for New Mexico. Nearly 600 settlers accompanied him, along with Mexican Indian allies and Franciscan friars. In a great cloud of dust, the slow-moving oxen-pulled carreta caravan creaked through the Valley of San Bartomlomé, sending its way northward.

Driving thousands of sheep, pigs, goats, cattle, mules and horses before them, men, women, and children overcame the hardships of the next seven months on the jornada. Scouts wandered far ahead of the wagon train searching for a route with adequate water and pasturage. For months on end, the desert air resounded with sharp cracks from whips of drovers who pushed the caravan farther into the tierra adentro. In late April, as they approached the Rio Grande near a place they called El Paso, light snow fell and a cool wind swept the Chihuahuan desert.

By mid-June, the Spanish frontiersmen had reached Socorro, where, in need of food, they traded with the Pueblo of Teypana. Slowly, their carretas rolled northward, passing through the valley of present-day Albuquerque, along the route that became El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, the Royal Road of the Interior, which originated in Mexico City.

Over seventy-five miles
La Jornada Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 22, 2011
2. La Jornada Marker
in advance of the wagon train, on July 4, 1598, Oņate and sixty horsemen reached San Juan Pueblo. Nearby, they established the first capital of New Mexico, which they named San Juan de Caballeros. By mid-August, the rest of the founding settlers of New Mexico arrived with sixty-one carretas. That summer, the first of many Hispanic settlements in New Mexico had been established. The heroic Jornada of 1598 to New Mexico is an important part of our national story.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro marker series.
 
Location. 35° 5.878′ N, 106° 40.046′ W. Marker is in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in Bernalillo County. Marker is at the intersection of Mountain Road NW and 19th Street NW, on the right when traveling east on Mountain Road NW. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Albuquerque NM 87104, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cuarto Centenario Memorial (here, next to this marker); Founding Women of Albuquerque (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Dominguez y Escalante Expedition (about 600 feet away); Albuquerque (approx. 0.2 miles away); Don Francisco Cuervo y Valdes
La Jornada sculpture image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 22, 2011
3. La Jornada sculpture
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Mountain Howitzers (approx. 0.2 miles away); Casa de Armijo (approx. 0.2 miles away); San Felipe De Neri (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Albuquerque.
 
Also see . . .  Explanantion of Main Figures of La Jornada Sculpture Group. From the New Mexico Hispanic Cultural Preservation League (Submitted on January 6, 2014, by Chris English of Phoenix, Arizona.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationSettlements & Settlers
 
La Jornada sculpture image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 22, 2011
4. La Jornada sculpture
La Jornada sculpture image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 22, 2011
5. La Jornada sculpture
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 2, 2011, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 765 times since then and 73 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 2, 2011, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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