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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Alexander City in Tallapoosa County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Alexander City: A Textile Community

 
 
Alexander City: A Textile Community Marker (Side A) image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
1. Alexander City: A Textile Community Marker (Side A)
Inscription.
Front
Youngsville, Alabama was incorporated in 1872. The name was changed to Alexander City in March 1873. In 1892, when cotton was king, farmers and planters in the Alexander City area were producing an estimated 18,000 bales of cotton a year. Community leaders sought to broaden the "Market City" by seeking a cotton mill as its first major manufacturing plant. The Alexander City Cotton Mill, built in 1901, was purchased in 1919 by the Braxton Bragg Comer Family. The Avondale "Bevelle" plant soon employed 350 men and women who produced yarn and woven ticking. The plant quickly expanded. Also, by 1902, Mr. Benjamin Russell established a knitting and sewing mill with 12 employees which evolved into Russell Corporation. The first products were ladies' and children's knitted under garments. Russell Mills' rapid expansion proved that cotton manufacturing was the right choice for the community.

Reverse:
Education and religion were deemed important by both Comer and Russell families. Subsequently, they built churches and schools and recruited qualified teachers and ministers which resulted in continuous growth of their mills, the mill villages, and the community. Both employers treated their mill workers and children with great regard. The families were recipients of many recreations and cultural events,
Alexander City: A Textile Community Marker (Side B) image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
2. Alexander City: A Textile Community Marker (Side B)
making a good life for all employees. This marker is dedicated and placed in honor of all textile mill workers, their families and company owners. It was their hard work, loyalty and pride in their work, companies and community that made this small town-hometown a great community for all citizens.
 
Erected 2010 by Alabama Tourism Department and the City of Alexander City.
 
Location. 32° 56.597′ N, 85° 57.213′ W. Marker is in Alexander City, Alabama, in Tallapoosa County. Marker is on Main Street, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 82 Court Square, Alexander City AL 35010, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. First Presbyterian Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Court Square (within shouting distance of this marker); The First Baptist Church (within shouting distance of this marker); The Savannah And Memphis Railroad 1874 (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Youngsville (approx. mile away); First United Methodist Church 1872 (approx. 0.3 miles away); Needmore 1873 (approx. 0.7 miles away); Menawa, War Chief (approx. 6 miles away but has been reported missing). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Alexander City.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers
 
Alexander City: A Textile Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
3. Alexander City: A Textile Community Marker
Alexander City: A Textile Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
4. Alexander City: A Textile Community Marker
Alexander City: A Textile Community Marker stands to the left of the Charles T. Porch Center image. Click for full size.
By TRCP Alliance, June 16, 2011
5. Alexander City: A Textile Community Marker stands to the left of the Charles T. Porch Center
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 6, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 511 times since then and 41 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 6, 2011, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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