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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Angel Fire in Colfax County, New Mexico — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Vietnam Veterans National Memorial

 
 
Vietnam Veterans National Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 23, 2011
1. Vietnam Veterans National Memorial Marker
Inscription. This chapel was erected in 1968 by Dr. Victor Westphall in memory of his son David Westphall and all U.S. personnel killed in the fighting in Vietnam. It was first dedicated as the Vietnam Veterans Peace and Brotherhood Chapel, and on May 30, 1983, it was rededicated as the Disabled American Veterans (DAV) Vietnam Veterans National Memorial.
 
Erected by New Mexico Historic Preservation Division.
 
Location. 36° 26.369′ N, 105° 17.366′ W. Marker is near Angel Fire, New Mexico, in Colfax County. Marker is at the intersection of U.S. 64 at milepost 276.8 and Valverde Road (Road B4), on the left when traveling east on U.S. 64. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Angel Fire NM 87710, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Palo Flechado Pass (approx. 3.1 miles away); Wheeler Peak (approx. 4.7 miles away); Eagle Nest Lake State Park (approx. 7.8 miles away); Elizabethtown (approx. 8 miles away); Palisades Sill (approx. 10.2 miles away); a different marker also named Wheeler Peak (approx. 10.8 miles away); Cimarron Canyon State Park (approx. 12 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Vietnam Veterans Memorial
<i>back of</i> Vietnam Veterans National Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 23, 2011
2. back of Vietnam Veterans National Memorial Marker
. The memorial was originally known as the Vietnam Veterans Peace and Brotherhood Chapel and had its origins in a battle near Con Thien, South Vietnam in which 16 men lost their lives. Among the men, was David Westphall, son of Victor and Jeanne Westphall. Thanks to their vision and determination the memorial exists today to honor not only these 16 Marines but all members of America's armed forces. (Submitted on August 7, 2011, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.) 
 
Categories. War, Vietnam
 
Vietnam Veterans National Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 23, 2011
3. Vietnam Veterans National Memorial Marker
Entrance to Vietnam Veterans National Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 23, 2011
4. Entrance to Vietnam Veterans National Memorial
Turn right and veer to the right for one-half mile to the Memorial parking area.
Vietnam Veterans National Memorial Chapel image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 23, 2011
5. Vietnam Veterans National Memorial Chapel
Plaque near chapel image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, July 23, 2011
6. Plaque near chapel
On April 24, 1994, Dr. Victor Westphall gathered a handful of soil from this spot and on May 2 1994, scattered it at the ambush site in Vietnam where Lt. Victor David Westphall, III lost his life on May 22, 1968. Dr. Westphall returned with earth from the ambush scene and mixed it here with New Mexico soil on May 5, 1994.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 7, 2011, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 669 times since then and 81 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 7, 2011, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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